HUS93 - Supplementary survey, Spell variables 1991-1993: Child care

SND-ID: snd0277-30. Version: 1.0. DOI: https://doi.org/10.5878/003046

Citation

Creator/Principal investigator(s)

Anders Klevmarken - University of Gothenburg, Department of Economics

Lennart Flood - University of Gothenburg, Department of Economics

Research principal

University of Gothenburg - Department of Economics rorId

Description

The Household Market and Nonmarket Activities (HUS) project started as a joint research project between the Industrial Institute for Economic and Social Research (IUI) and Göteborg University in 1980. The ambition was to build a consistent longitudinal micro data base on the use of time, money and public services of households.
The first main survey was carried out in 1984. In addition to a contact interview with the selected individuals, all designated individuals participated in a personal interview and two telephone interviews. All respondents were asked about their family background, education, marital status, labor market experience, and employment. In addition, questions about the household were asked of the head of household, concerning family composition, child care, health status, housing, possession of vacation homes, cars, boats and other consumption durables. At the end of the personal interview the household head had to fill out a questionnaire including questions about financing of current home, construction costs for building a house, house value and loans, imputation of proper

... Show more..
The Household Market and Nonmarket Activities (HUS) project started as a joint research project between the Industrial Institute for Economic and Social Research (IUI) and Göteborg University in 1980. The ambition was to build a consistent longitudinal micro data base on the use of time, money and public services of households.
The first main survey was carried out in 1984. In addition to a contact interview with the selected individuals, all designated individuals participated in a personal interview and two telephone interviews. All respondents were asked about their family background, education, marital status, labor market experience, and employment. In addition, questions about the household were asked of the head of household, concerning family composition, child care, health status, housing, possession of vacation homes, cars, boats and other consumption durables. At the end of the personal interview the household head had to fill out a questionnaire including questions about financing of current home, construction costs for building a house, house value and loans, imputation of property values and loans, additions/renovations 1983, maintenance and repairs, leasing, sale of previous home, assets and liabilities, and non-taxable benefits. All the respondents had to fill out a questionnaire including questions about tax-return information 1983, employment income, and taxes and support payments. Two telephone interviews were used primarily to collect data on the household´s time use and consumption expenditures.
The 1986 HUS-survey included both a follow-up of the 1984 sample (panel study) and a supplementary sample. The 1986 sample included
1) all respondents participating in the 1984 survey, 2) the household heads, partners and third persons who should have participated in 1984 but did not (1984 nonresponse), 3) those individuals who started living together after the 1984 interview with an selected individual who participated or was supposed to participate in 1984, 4) members of the 1984 household born in 1966 or 1967.
If entering a new household, for example because of leaving their parental home, the household head and his/her partner were also interviewed. Respondents participating in the 1984 survey were interviewed by telephone in 1986.
Questions dealt with changes in family composition, housing, employment, wages and child care, and it was not only recorded whether a change had occurred, and what sort of change, but also when it occurred. The respondents also received a questionnaire by mail with questions mainly concerning income and assets.
Respondents not participating in the earlier survey were interviewed in person and were asked approximately the same questions as in the 1984 personal interview.
The 1988 HUS-survey was considerably smaller than the previous ones. It was addressed exclusively to participants in the 1986 survey, and consisted of a self-enumerated questionnaire with a nonrespondent follow-up by telephone. The questions dealt with changes in housing conditions, employment and household composition. The questionnaire also contained some questions on household income.
In many respect the 1991 HUS-survey replicated the 1988 survey. The questions were basically the same in content and range, and the survey was conducted as a self-enamurated questionnaire sent out by mail. This time, however, in contrast to the 1988 survey, an attempt was made to include in the survey the new household members who had moved into sample households since 1986, as well as young people who turned 18 after the 1986 survey. Earlier respondents received a questionnaire by mail containing questions about their home, their primary occupation and weekly work hours since May 1988 (event-history data), earnings in 1989, 1990 and 1991, household composition and any changes in it that might have occurred since 1988, child care and some questions on income. New respondents were also asked about their education and labor-market experience.
With respect to its design and question wording, the 1993 survey is a new version of the 1986 survey. The survey is made up of four parts:
1) the panel survey, which was addressed mainly to respondents in the 1991 survey, with certain additions; 2) the so-called supplementary survey, which focused on a new random sample of individuals; 3) the so-called nonresponse survey, which encompassed respondents who had participated in at least one of the earlier surveys but had since dropped out; 4) the time-use survey, which included the same sample of respondents as those in the panel and supplementary surveys.
Individuals in the nonresponse group were not included in the time-use survey. Most of the questions in the first three surveys were the same, but certain questions sequences were targeted to the respondents in a specific survey. Thus certain retrospective questions were asked of the nonresponse group, while specific questions on social background, labor market experience etc. were addressed to new respondents. In the case of respondents who had already participated in the panel, a combined contact and main interview was conducted by telephone, after which a self-enumerated questionnaire was sent out to each respondent by mail. The panel sample also included young people in panel households who were born in 1973 or 1974 as well as certain new household members who had not previously been interviewed. These individuals, like new respondents, were not interviewed by telephone until they had been interviewed personally. Thus technically they were treated in the same manner as individuals in the supplementary sample. The new supplementary sample was first contacted by telephone and then given a fairly lengthy personal interview, at the conclusion of which each respondent was asked to fill out a written questionnaire. In this respect the survey design for the nonresponse sample was the same as for the supplementary sample. The nonresponse sample also included young people born in 1973 or 1974 as well as certain new household members. The time-use interviews were conducted by telephone. For each respondent two days were chosen at random from the period from February 15, 1993 to February 14, 1994 and the respondents were interviewed about their time use during those two days. If possible, the time-use interviews were preceded by the other parts of the survey, but this was not always feasible. In each household the household head and spouse/partner were interviewed, as well as an additional person in certain households. Questions regarding the household as a whole were asked of only one person in the household, preferably the household head. As in earlier surveys, data from the interviews was subsequently supplemented by registry data, but only for those respondents who had given their express consent. There is registry information for 75-80 percent of the sample. The telephone interview is divided into following sections: administrative data; labor market experience; employment; job-seekers; not in labor force; education; family composition; child care; health status; other household members; housing conditions; vacation homes; and cars and boats. The questionnaire was divided into twelve sections: sale of previous home; acquisition of current home; construction costs for building a home; house value and loans; repairs; insurance; home-related expenses; sale of previous home; assets; household income; taxes; and respondent income 1992.
The 1996 telephone interview is divided into following sections: administrative data; labor market experience; employment; job-seekers; not in labor force; education; family composition; child care; health status; other household members; housing conditions; vacation homes; cars and boats; and environment. The questionnaire was divided into twelve sections: sale of previous home; acquisition of current home; construction costs for building a home; house value and loans; repairs; insurance; home-related expenses; sale of previous home; assets; household income; taxes; and respondent income 1995.
The 1998 telephone interview is divided into following sections: administrative data; labor market experience; employment; job-seekers; not in labor force; education; family composition; child care; health status; other household members; housing conditions; vacation homes; cars and boats; and municipal service. The questionnaire was divided into nine sections: sale of previous home; house value and loans; insurance; home-related expenses; assets; household income; inheritances and gifts; black-market work; and respondent income 1997. Show less..

Data contains personal data

No

Language

Method and outcome

Unit of analysis

Population

Swedish speaking households 1984, where the head of the household is born 1910-1965.

Sampling procedure

Probability: Simple random
The 1984 sample was a two-stage random sample of about 2000 households with a response rate of 76%. The population excluded people 75 years or older, those who lived in institutions or abroad, and those who did not speak Swedish well enough for an interview. In households with two spouses both spouses were interviewed. In some households also a third adult was interviewed. New supplementary samples were drawn in 1986, 1993, 1996 and in 1998.

Time period(s) investigated

1984-01-01 – 1998-01-01

Variables

16

Number of individuals/objects

1012

Data format / data structure

Data collection
  • Time period(s) for data collection: 1984-01-01 – 1998-01-01
  • Source of the data: Population group
Geographic coverage

Geographic spread

Geographic location: Sweden

Administrative information

Responsible department/unit

Department of Economics

Funding 1

  • Funding agency: Swedish Council for Planning and Coordination of Research

Funding 2

  • Funding agency: Swedish Council for Research in the Humanitie and Social Sciences

Funding 3

  • Funding agency: Committee for Evaluating Tax Reform

Funding 4

  • Funding agency: Swedish Council for Social Research

Funding 5

  • Funding agency: Industriens Utredningsinstitut
Topic and keywords

Research area

Consumption and consumer behaviour (CESSDA Topic Classification)

Housing (CESSDA Topic Classification)

Employment (CESSDA Topic Classification)

Social sciences (Standard för svensk indelning av forskningsämnen 2011)

Economics and business (Standard för svensk indelning av forskningsämnen 2011)

Income, property and investment/saving (CESSDA Topic Classification)

Family life and marriage (CESSDA Topic Classification)

Time use (CESSDA Topic Classification)

Economic conditions and indicators (CESSDA Topic Classification)

Publications

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Flood, L. (1997) Household market and nonmarket activities (HUS). Procedures and Codes for 1993 Time-use Survey. Volume VI. Uppsala: Department of Economics.

Flood, L., & Olovsson, P. (1999) Household market and nonmarket activities (HUS). Survey description. 1996 Panel survey. Volume VII. Göteborg: Department of Economics.

Flood, L., & Olovsson, P. (2000) Household market and nonmarket activities (HUS). Survey description. 1998 Panel survey. Volume VIII. Göteborg: Department of Economics.

Flood, L., Klevmarken, A., & Olovsson, P. (1997) Household market and nonmarket activities (HUS). 1993 Nonresponse Study. Volume IV. Uppsala: Department of Economics.

Flood, L., Klevmarken, A., & Olovsson, P. (1997) Household market and nonmarket activities (HUS). 1993 Supplementary survey. Volume V. Uppsala: Department of Economics.

Flood, L., Klevmarken, A., & Olovsson, P. (1997) Household market and nonmarket activities (HUS). Survey description. 1993 Panel survey. Volume III. Uppsala: Department of Economics.

Klevmarken, N. A. (1990) Household market and nonmarket activities (HUS). Design, field work and nonresponse. Memorandum nr. 144. Göteborg: Department of Economics.
Google Books

Klevmarken, N. A. (ed.) (1986) Tid och pengar. Om svenska hushålls ekonomi. Göteborg: Department of Economics and the Industrial Institute for Economics and Social Research (IUI).

Klevmarken, N. A., & Olovsson, P. (1993) Household market and nonmarket activities. Procedures and codes 1984-1991. Volume I and II. Stockholm: Almqvist & Wiksell International.

Klevmarken, N. A., Olovsson, P., Flood, L., et. al. (1986) Hushållens ekonomiska levnadsförhållanden (HUS). Teknisk beskrivning och kodbok för 1984 års HUS-data. Göteborg: Department of Economics.

Eurenius, O och Regnér, J. (2009) Vägen till högskolan - en studie av sambandet mellan social bakgrund och högre studier. Studentarbete i statistik, Institutionen för informationsvetenskap, Uppsala universitet

If you have published anything based on these data, please notify us with a reference to your publication(s). If you are responsible for the catalogue entry, you can update the metadata/data description in DORIS.

Versions

Version 1.0. 1996-02-02

Version 1.0: 1996-02-02

DOI: https://doi.org/10.5878/003046

Related research data in SND's catalogue

HUS98 - Panel survey 1998

HUS - Administrative data

HUS86 - Panel survey 1986

HUS88 - Panel survey 1988

HUS91 - Panel survey 1991

HUS93 - Panel survey 1993

HUS96 - Panel survey 1996

HUS84 - Panel survey 1984

HUS84 - Time-use survey, First time-use survey

HUS84 - Time-use survey, Second time-use interview

HUS86 - Supplementary survey 1986

HUS93 - Panel survey, Supplementary variables: Current child care

HUS93 - Panel survey, Supplementary variables: Waiting list for child care

HUS93 - Panel survey, Spell variables 1984-1993: Type of employment

HUS93 - Panel survey, Spell variables 1984-1993: Weekly work hours

HUS93 - Panel survey, Spell variables 1984-1993: Labour market experiences

HUS93 - Panel survey, Spell variables 1984-1993: Additional jobs

HUS93 - Panel survey, Spell variables 1984-1993: Changes in household composition

HUS93 - Panel survey, Spell variables 1984-1993: Moves

HUS93 - Panel survey, Spell variables 1984-1993: Child care

HUS93 - Nonresponse study 1993

HUS93 - Nonresponse study, Supplementary variables: Household composition

HUS93 - Nonresponse study, Supplementary variables: Current child care

HUS93 - Nonresponse study, Spell variables: Labour market experience

HUS93 - Nonresponse study, Spell variables: Household composition - persons moving out

HUS93 - Nonresponse study, Spell variables: Household composition - persons moving in

HUS93 - Nonresponse study, Spell variables: Household composition - persons moving out and returning

HUS93 - Nonresponse study, Spell variables: Changes in housing

HUS93 - Nonresponse study, Spell variables: Child care 1991-1993

HUS98 - Supplementary survey 1998

HUS93 - Supplementary survey 1993

HUS93 - Supplementary survey, Supplementary variables: Current child care

HUS93 - Time-use survey, First time-use interview

HUS93 - Time-use survey, Second time-use interview

HUS96 - Supplementary variables: Current child care

HUS96 - Supplementary variables: Waiting list for child care

HUS96 - Spell variables 1984-1996: Type of employment

HUS96 - Spell variables 1984-1996: Weekly work hours

HUS96 - Spell variables 1993-1996: Labor market experience

HUS96 - Spell variables 1993-1996: Additional jobs

HUS96 - Spell variables 1993-1996: Changes in household composition

HUS96 - Spell variables 1993-1996: Moves

HUS96 - Spell variables 1993-1996: Child care

HUS96 - Supplementary survey 1996

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Published: 1996-02-02
Last updated: 2020-05-05