Mindfulness training supported by a restorative natural setting: Integrating individual and environmental approaches to the management of adaptive resources

Creator/Principal investigator(s):

Freddie Lymeus - Uppsala University, Department of Psychology

Terry Hartig - Uppsala University, Institute for Housing and Urban Research

Per Lindberg - Uppsala University, Department of Psychology

Description:

This project integrates restorative environments research and mindfulness research: two disparate but related approaches to managing the demands of modern living. Both offer ways to improve attention regulation by detaching from routine mental contents and engaging with present experience. However, restoration works bottom-up, from supportive environmental features, while mindfulness meditation works top-down, through effortful training. Complementarities between the two are the foundations of restoration skills training (ReST), a five-week mindfulness-based course that uses mindful sensory exploration in a natural setting to build a meditative state effortlessly. As in conventional mindfulness training (CMT), ReST involves a learning structure to teach versatile adaptive skills. Data were collected in four rounds, with successively refined versions of ReST given in a botanic garden and formally matched CMT given indoors. Data were collected to test short-term outcomes of practice sessions and long-term course outcomes.

Subject area:

PSYCHOLOGY (CESSDA Topic Classification)
Psychology (The Swedish standard of fields of research 2011)

Responsible department/unit:

Uppsala University, Department of Psychology

Creator/Principal investigator(s):

Freddie Lymeus - Uppsala University, Department of Psychology

Terry Hartig - Uppsala University, Institute for Housing and Urban Research

Per Lindberg - Uppsala University, Department of Psychology

Identifiers:

SND-ID: 2020-17

Description:

This project integrates restorative environments research and mindfulness research: two disparate but related approaches to managing the demands of modern living. Both offer ways to improve attention regulation by detaching from routine mental contents and engaging with present experience. However, restoration works bottom-up, from supportive environmental features, while mindfulness meditation works top-down, through effortful training. Complementarities between the two are the foundations of restoration skills training (ReST), a five-week mindfulness-based course that uses mindful sensory exploration in a natural setting to build a meditative state effortlessly. As in conventional mindfulness training (CMT), ReST involves a learning structure to teach versatile adaptive skills. Data were collected in four rounds, with successively refined versions of ReST given in a botanic garden and formally matched CMT given indoors. Data were collected to test short-term outcomes of practice sessions and long-term course outcomes.

Language:

English

Time period(s) investigated:

2013 — 2017

Geographic spread:

Geographic location: Sweden

Geographic description: Botanical Gardens of Uppsala, Uppsala Linnaean Gardens

Unit of analysis:

Population:

University students with stress or concentration problems

Sampling procedure:

Non-probability: Availability

Ethics Review:

Uppsala — Ref. 2013/033

Subject area:

PSYCHOLOGY (CESSDA Topic Classification)
Psychology (The Swedish standard of fields of research 2011)

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Publications

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Lymeus, F., Ahrling, M., Apelman, J., Florin, C. de M., Nilsson, C., Vincenti, J., Zetterberg, A., Lindberg, P., & Hartig, T. (2020). Mindfulness-based restoration skills training (ReST) in a natural setting compared to conventional mindfulness training: Psychological functioning after a five-week course. Frontiers in Psychology.

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Mindfulness-based restoration skills training (ReST) in a natural setting compared to conventional mindfulness training: Psychological functioning after a five-week course

Suggested citation:

Freddie Lymeus, Terry Hartig, Per Lindberg. Uppsala University, Department of Psychology (2020). <em>Mindfulness-based restoration skills training (ReST) in a natural setting compared to conventional mindfulness training: Psychological functioning after a five-week course</em>. Swedish National Data Service. Version 1. <a href="https://doi.org/10.5878/p34t-9j15">https://doi.org/10.5878/p34t-9j15</a>

Creator/Principal investigator(s):

Freddie Lymeus - Uppsala University, Department of Psychology

Terry Hartig - Uppsala University, Institute for Housing and Urban Research

Per Lindberg - Uppsala University, Department of Psychology

Description:

This data set underlies analyses presented in (Lymeus et al. (2020) Mindfulness-based restoration skills training (ReST) in a natural setting compared to conventional mindfulness training: Psychological functioning after a five-week course. Frontiers in Psychology). Data were collected before and directly after two different five-week mindfulness training courses: restoration skills training (ReST) and conventional mindfulness training, between which participants were randomly assigned. Particip

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Data format / data structure:

Numeric

Data collection:

Mode of collection: Self-administered questionnaire

Time period(s) for data collection: 2013 — 2017

Data collector: Uppsala University

Source of the data: Research data: Published

Time period(s) investigated:

2013-01 — 2017-06

Variables:

30

Number of individuals/objects:

181

Response rate/participation rate:

70

Published: 2020-08-10