Prevalence of bovine norovirus and nebovirus and risk factors for infection in Swedish dairy herds

SND-ID: 2021-335

Creator/Principal investigator(s)

Madeleine Tråven - Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Clinical Sciences orcid

Charlotte Axén - National Veterinary Institute

Anna Svensson - Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Clinical Sciences orcid

Camilla Björkman - Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Clinical Sciences

Ulf Emanuelson - Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Clinical Sciences orcid

Description

Aim of the study was to determine the prevalence of bovine norovirus and nebovirus infections in dairy calves in Sweden. A secondary aim was to analyse herd and management factors associated with these infections. In this study, samples and data collected for another study in 2005-2007 were used (Silverlås et al. 2009. Prev. Vet. Med. 90, 242-253). The samples and data were originally collected for studying Cryptosporidium infections. Fecal samples from 5 calves 2-30 days of age were collected by a veterinarian visiting each farm once, in total 50 farms. For the present study, samples were analysed by RT-PCR for bovine norovirus and nebovirus. For specification of the methods, see the published paper. The management data were collected at the farm visits by observation and interview of farmers using a standardized questionnaire.

Language

English

Research principal, contributors, and funding

Principal's reference number

SLU.kv.2021.4.4-195

Other research principals

Funding

  • Funding agency: The Swedish farmers' research foundation rorId
  • Funding agency's reference number: V0830393
  • Project name on the application: Bovine caliciviruses - prevalence and epidemiology in Swedish cattle
Protection and ethical review

Data contains personal data

Yes

Type of personal data

Herd registration number pseudonym

Code key exists

Yes

Method and time period

Population

250 milkfed dairy calves in 50 herds

Time Method

Sampling procedure

Probability
50 dairy herds were randomly selected from a list of all dairy herds with >50 cows in the 5 geographic regions of the study, in proportion to the no. of herds in each region. Five calves aged 2-30 days were sampled per herd. For more information on the selection of calves, see the published paper.

Time period(s) investigated

2005 – 2007

Geographic coverage

Geographic spread

Geographic location: Sweden

Geographic description: The farms included in the study are situated in the counties Skåne, Västergötland, Östergötland, Uppland and the province southern Norrland.

Topic and keywords
Publications

Tråvén, M.; Axén, C.; Svensson, A.; Björkman, C.; Emanuelson, U. (2022). Prevalence of Bovine Norovirus and Nebovirus and Risk Factors of Infection in Swedish Dairy Herds. Dairy 3(1), 137-147.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3390/dairy3010011

If you have published anything based on these data, please notify us with a reference to your publication(s). If you are responsible for the catalogue entry, you can update the metadata/data description in DORIS.

Dataset
Prevalence of bovine norovirus and nebovirus and risk factors for infection in Swedish dairy herds

Description

The dataset contains the results of RT-PCR analyses of fecal samples from young calves for bovine norovirus and nebovirus. Five calves per herd in 50 Swedish dairy herds were included in the study. The dataset also includes information about the herd, i.e. herd size, average yearly production and a number of variables concerning management of calvings and calves. Such management routines could influence the level of calf health and transmission of infections. These data were gathered through sta

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Data format / data structure

Numeric

Text

Creator/Principal investigator(s)

Madeleine Tråven - Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Clinical Sciences orcid

Charlotte Axén - National Veterinary Institute

Time period(s) investigated

2005 – 2007

Variables

25

License

Creative Commons  Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0)
Published: 2022-02-28