ISSP 1996 - Role of government III: Sweden

This study is part of the collection ISSP - International Social Survey Programme

Creator/Principal investigator(s):

Stefan Svallfors - Umeå University, Department of Sociology

Description:

This survey is the Swedish part of the 1996 'International Social Survey Program'. Citizens' opinions were elicited on the function of their national governments and on what governments should and should not be doing. Respondents were asked whether they approved of economic policies such as wage and price controls, job creation programs, including public work projects, support for ailing private industries, and the forced reduction in the industrial work week, as well as conservative measures, such as reductions in government spending and business regulations. Government spending was another topic, with respondents questioned as to their support for greater spending on the environment, health care, police and law enforcement, education, military and defence, culture and the arts, old age pensions, unemployment benefits, and housing for the poor. A number of questions dealt with respondents' attitudes regarding democracy, political power, and protest. Respondents were asked for their views on the rule of law when it is in conflict with private conscience, various forms of anti-government protes

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Responsible department/unit:

Creator/Principal investigator(s):

Stefan Svallfors - Umeå University, Department of Sociology

Identifiers:

SND-ID: SND 0587

Purpose:

ISSP aims to design and implement internationally comparable attitude surveys. The study in 1996 investigating The Role of Government.

Description:

This survey is the Swedish part of the 1996 'International Social Survey Program'. Citizens' opinions were elicited on the function of their national governments and on what governments should and should not be doing. Respondents were asked whether they approved of economic policies such as wage and price controls, job creation programs, including public work projects, support for ailing private industries, and the forced reduction in the industrial work week, as well as conservative measures, such as reductions in government spending and business regulations. Government spending was another topic, with respondents questioned as to their support for greater spending on the environment, health care, police and law enforcement, education, military and defence, culture and the arts, old age pensions, unemployment benefits, and housing for the poor. A number of questions dealt with respondents' attitudes regarding democracy, political power, and protest. Respondents were asked for their views on the rule of law when it is in conflict with private conscience, various forms of anti-government protes

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Language:

English

Swedish

Time period(s) investigated:

1996-02-01

Geographic spread:

Geographic location: Sweden

Lowest geographic unit:

National area (NUTS2)

Highest geographic unit:

Country

Unit of analysis:

Population:

Individuals aged 18-74 years and residing in Sweden

Sampling procedure:

Probability: Simple random

Publications

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Hjerm, M., & Svallfors, S. (1997) Åsikter om politiken och den offentliga sektorn : kodbok för maskinläsbar datafil. Umeå: Department of Sociology.

If you have published anything based on these data, please notify us with a reference to your publication(s).

Version 1.1:

2009-08-28 doi:10.5878/001600

Metadata enriched

Version 1.0:

1997-11-25 doi:10.5878/001599

Available documentation:

ISSP 1996 - Role of government III: Sweden

Citation:

Stefan Svallfors. Umeå University, Department of Sociology (2009). ISSP 1996 - Role of government III: Sweden. Swedish National Data Service. Version 1.1. https://doi.org/10.5878/001600

Data format / data structure:

Numeric

Data collection:

Mode of collection: Self-administered questionnaire: paper

Time period(s) for data collection: 1996-02 — 1996-05

Data collector: Statistics Sweden

Source of the data: Population group

Variables:

137

Number of individuals/objects:

1238

Response rate/participation rate:

68,3%