Working conditions and health at call centres in Sweden

Creator/Principal investigator(s):

Allan Toomingas - National Institute for Working Life, Work and Health

Kerstin Norman - National Institute for Working Life, Work and Health

Ewa Wigaeus Tornqvist - National Institute for Working Life, Work and Health

Description:

There are a range of problems associated with job on call centres. A range of problems associated with the job have become apparent, with time pressure, performance monitoring via computer, monitoring of phone calls, ergonomic deficiencies and musculoskeletal problems amongst the problems reported. An earlier study of a call centre in Sweden found inadequate working conditions and signs of ill health amongst a high percentage of the population in their 20s who had only been working for 2-3 years. The situation was worse there than amongst older employees in other industries with computer-intensive jobs.
Inadequate working conditions and the high incidence of medical complaints amongst young employees may mean that call centres are failing to provide the sustainable work opportunities that many are counting on, e.g. in rural areas. Scientific studies of call centres are few and the state of knowledge of working conditions and health there is deficient.
A cross-sectional study into working and health conditions at call centres in Sweden was conducted with the aim of contributing to a sustainab

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Principal organisation:

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Creator/Principal investigator(s):

Allan Toomingas - National Institute for Working Life, Work and Health

Kerstin Norman - National Institute for Working Life, Work and Health

Ewa Wigaeus Tornqvist - National Institute for Working Life, Work and Health

Identifiers:

SND-ID: SND 0838

Description:

There are a range of problems associated with job on call centres. A range of problems associated with the job have become apparent, with time pressure, performance monitoring via computer, monitoring of phone calls, ergonomic deficiencies and musculoskeletal problems amongst the problems reported. An earlier study of a call centre in Sweden found inadequate working conditions and signs of ill health amongst a high percentage of the population in their 20s who had only been working for 2-3 years. The situation was worse there than amongst older employees in other industries with computer-intensive jobs.
Inadequate working conditions and the high incidence of medical complaints amongst young employees may mean that call centres are failing to provide the sustainable work opportunities that many are counting on, e.g. in rural areas. Scientific studies of call centres are few and the state of knowledge of working conditions and health there is deficient.
A cross-sectional study into working and health conditions at call centres in Sweden was conducted with the aim of contributing to a sustainab

... Show more..

Language:

Swedish

Time period(s) investigated:

2001 — 2003

Geographic spread:

Geographic location: Sweden

Unit of analysis:

Sampling procedure:

A total of 38 call- centres with at least 50 employed was invited to participate in the study. The company were selected to represent both internal and external call centres. 16 companies represented 28 different workplaces, 16 internal and 12 external agreed to take part in the study.

Funding:

Swedish Council for Working Life and Social Research

Publications

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Norman K, Wigaeus Tornqvist E, Toomingas A. Working conditions in a selected sample of call centre companies in Sweden. International Journal of Occupational Safety and Ergonomics.2008;14:2,177-94
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Norman K, Floderus B, Hagman M, Toomingas A. Musculoskeletal symptoms in relation to work exposures at call centre companies in Sweden. Work.2008;30(2):201-14

If you have published anything based on these data, please notify us with a reference to your publication(s).

Working conditions and health at call centres in Sweden

Data format / data structure:

Numeric

Number of individuals/objects:

1531

Response rate/participation rate:

77%