Validation of an air-liquid interface toxicological set-up using Cu, Pd and Ag well-characterized nanostructured aggregates and spheres

Creator/Principal investigator(s):

Christian Svensson - Faculty of Engineering, Lund University, Department of Design Sciences

Description:

Systems for studying the toxicity of metal aggregates on the airways are normally not suited for evaluating the effects of individual particle characteristics. This study validates a set-up for toxicological studies of metal aggregates using an air-liquid interface approach.

The set-up used a spark discharge generator capable of generating aerosol metal aggregate particles and sintered near spheres. The set-up also contained an exposure chamber, The Nano Aerosol Chamber for In Vitro Toxicity (NACIVT). The system facilitates on-line characterization capabilities of mass mobility, mass concentration and number size distribution to determine the exposure. By dilution, the desired exposure level was controlled.

Primary and cancerous airway cells were exposed to copper (Cu), palladium (Pd) and silver (Ag) aggregates. For Cu and Pd an exposure of sintered aerosol particles were also produced. The doses of the particles was expressed as particle numbers, masses and surface areas. For the Cu, Pd and Ag aerosol particles, a range of mass surface concentrations on the air-liquid interface of 0.4-1

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Keywords:

Principal organisation:

Download data:

SND 0993-001 v1.0.zip (121.16 KB)
Dataset

Responsible department/unit:

Creator/Principal investigator(s):

Christian Svensson - Faculty of Engineering, Lund University, Department of Design Sciences

Identifiers:

SND-ID: SND 0993

Purpose:

The aim of this study is to validate a set-up for air-liquid interface toxicological research using highly characterized metal aggregate, and near spherical, aerosol particles. It combine a high output aerosol particle generator with continuous online exposure monitoring. The NACIVT was used for the study to ensure a high degree of deposition of aerosol particles on cell cultures, as well as to ensure a physiologically relevant environment during exposures.

Description:

Systems for studying the toxicity of metal aggregates on the airways are normally not suited for evaluating the effects of individual particle characteristics. This study validates a set-up for toxicological studies of metal aggregates using an air-liquid interface approach.

The set-up used a spark discharge generator capable of generating aerosol metal aggregate particles and sintered near spheres. The set-up also contained an exposure chamber, The Nano Aerosol Chamber for In Vitro Toxicity (NACIVT). The system facilitates on-line characterization capabilities of mass mobility, mass concentration and number size distribution to determine the exposure. By dilution, the desired exposure level was controlled.

Primary and cancerous airway cells were exposed to copper (Cu), palladium (Pd) and silver (Ag) aggregates. For Cu and Pd an exposure of sintered aerosol particles were also produced. The doses of the particles was expressed as particle numbers, masses and surface areas. For the Cu, Pd and Ag aerosol particles, a range of mass surface concentrations on the air-liquid interface of 0.4-1

... Show more..

Language:

English

Time period(s) investigated:

2011-01-01 — 2013-01-01

Unit of analysis:

Keywords:

Version 1.0:

2016-03-01 doi:10.5878/002761

Download data:

SND 0993-001 v1.0.zip (121.16 KB)
Dataset

Available documentation:

Validation of an air-liquid interface toxicological set-up using Cu, Pd and Ag well-characterized nanostructured aggregates and spheres

Citation:

Christian Svensson. Lund University (2016). Validation of an air-liquid interface toxicological set-up using Cu, Pd and Ag well-characterized nanostructured aggregates and spheres. Swedish National Data Service. Version 1.0. https://doi.org/10.5878/002761

Principal investigator(s):

Description:

Physical and biological data from air liquid interface cellular exposure studies.

Data format / data structure:

Numeric

Data collection:

Time period(s) for data collection: 2011-01-01 — 2013-01-01

Source of the data: Biological samples, Other

Variables:

64