ATTITUDES TO INEQUALITY 1991
                          A Swedish survey
                              SSD 0297

                       Principal investigator
                          Stefan Svallfors
                       Department of Sociology
                         University of Umeå

                          First SSD edition
                            November 1992

    

                 Swedish Social Science Data Service
                           Skanstorget 18

                  Go to variable list
                          S-411 22 Göteborg

    
                    ACKNOWLEDGMENT OF ASSISTANCE

    All manuscripts utilizing data made available through the
    Swedish Social Science Data Service should acknowledge that
    fact as well as identify the original collector of the data.
    SSD urges all users of SSD data facilities to follow some
    adaption of this statement with the parantheses indicating
    items to be filled in appropriately or deleted by the
    individual user.

              The data (and tabulations) utilized in this
              (publication) were made available (in part) by
              the Swedish Social Science Data Service. The
              data for ATTITUDES TO INEQUALITY 1991 - A
              SWEDISH SURVEY were originally collected by
              Stefan Svallfors, Department of Sociology,
              University of Umeå. Neither the collector of
              the original data nor SSD bear any responsibility
              for the analyses or interpretations presented
              here.

    According to an agreement between Stefan Svallfors and the
    Swedish Social Science Data Service ATTITUDES TO INEQUALITY
    1991 - A SWEDISH SURVEY can be disseminated to and analysed
    by researchers on condition that the usage is for research
    purpose. The code of ethics for humanities and social
    sciences research established by the Swedish Humanities and
    Social Sciences Research Council, and published in
    HSFR-ETIK, must be adhered to wherever applicable.

    Data and/or documentation can not be made available to any
    third party without the written permission of SSD.

    Two copies of all reports based on these data shall be sent
    to the SSD, which will forward one copy to the principal
    investigator(s).

    

                              CONTENTS

                                                           Page

    INTRODUCTION

           Background                                         I

           Codebook information                              II

           SSD documentation                                III

    VARIABEL DESCRIPTION                                     IV

    CODEBOOK                                                  1

    
                                  I

                            INTRODUCTION

                             BACKGROUND

    The survey, made in 1991, is mainly a replication of the
    1987 module in the International Social Survey Program
    (ISSP) which was conducted in ten countries. Data for the
    other surveys may be obtained from Zentralarchiv,
    Universität zu Köln, Bachemer Str. 40, D-5000 Köln 41 (Att.
    Dr Rolf Uher).

    SAMPLE AND FIELD WORK

    Contex of the survey:
    Separate postal survey with two reminders by post to all
    non-respondents and a telephone interview follow-up on a
    sub-sample of remaining non-respondents.

    Sample:
    A representative sample of the Swedish population 18-74
    years
    Samplesize: 1 498 individuals.

    Fieldwork:
    The fieldwork was conducted by Statistics Sweden, February -
    April 1991.

    Response rate:

                              n       %
    Original sample          1498
    Emigrated, living in
    institutions, no known
    address                    45

    Net sample:              1453        100
    Responses (weighted)      915       62.9
      by mail                 701       48.2
      by telephone            214       14.7
    Non-responses             538       37.0
      refusals                215       14.8
      no contact              323       22.2

    

    WEIGHTING:

    A subsample was drawn among those who had still not
    responded after two subsequent reminders. 50% of them were
    selected for telephone interviewing, following the normal
    practices of Statistics Sweden. All respondents in the
    subsample has accordingly been given the weight 2. In order
    to keep the representativeness of the sample, all
    calculations should be made using the weight (variable 5).

    For more information see:

    Stenberg, Katarina   Attitudes to inequality - a Swedish
    Svallfors, Stefan    survey. Codebook for machine-readable
                         codebook.
                         Umeå: Department of Sociology, 1992

    
                                 II

                        CODEBOOK INFORMATION

    The example below is a reproduction of information appearing
    in a machine-readable codebook for a typical variable. The
    numbers in brackets do not appear but are references to the
    descriptions which follow this example.

    ............................................................

    (1) VAR 27   (2) DIFFERENCES IN PAY      3    (3) MD=9
        REF 27   (4) LOC 41  WIDTH 1              (5) NUMERIC

     (6) Q.3  Some people earn a lot of money while others
              do not earn very much at all. In order to get
              people to work hard, do you think large
              differences in pay are ...

     (7) ......................

        (8)  (9)  (10)
       116    1.   Absolutely necessary
       353    2.   Probably necessary
       159    3.   Probably not necessary
        77    4.   Definitely not necessary
        40    8.   Don't know

         4    9.   No answer

    ............................................................

    (1) Variabel- and reference number. Usually identical.
    Should the data be subset or rearranged by an OSIRIS
    program, the variable numbers would change to reflect the
    order of the new dataset, while the reference number would
    remain unchanged to reflect the variable number in the
    codebook describing the archived dataset.

    (2) Variable name. An abbreviation of the question at issue
    (maximum of 24 characters).

    (3) Missing data. Indicates the code values of missing data.

    (4) Position. Indicates the starting location and width of
    this variable.

    (5) Indicates if data is numeric or alphabetic.

    

    (6) The full text (question) supplied by the investigator to
    describe the variable.

    (7) Additional comments or explanations appended to the
    variable description.

    (8) Frequency of occurence of each code value.

    (9) Code values occuring in the data.

    (10) Textual definitions of the codes.

    
                                 III

                          SSD DOCUMENTATION

    The documentation has been processed using a computer-based
    documentation system made available for the SSD from the
    Inter-University Consortium for Political and Social
    Research (ICPSR) at the University of Michigan. The system
    is called Guided Interactive Dataset Organization (GIDO).

    




Variable list


1 SSD Study Number-0297 2 SSD Edition Number-1 3 SSD Part Number-001 4 ID-number 5 Weight 6 Sex 7 Marital status 8 Age 9 County 10 Nation 11 Region 12 H-region OPPORTUNITIES FOR GETTING AHEAD IN LIFE 13 Wealthy family 14 Well educated parents 15 Good education 16 Ambition 17 Natural ability 18 Hard work 19 Knowing the right people 20 Political connections 21 Race 22 Religion 23 Part of country 24 Gender 25 Political beliefs 26 Chance of improving standard of living DIFFERENCES IN PAY 27 Differences in pay necessary 28 Extra responsibility 29 Skills and qualifications 30 Inequality benefits the rich 31 No one would study for years unless more pay 32 Income differences necessary for Swedens prosperity 33 Good profits for business improves everyones standard of living 34 People don't join together to get rid of inequality MONTHLY SALARY FOR DIFFERENT JOBS 35 Bricklayer 36 Doctor in general practice 37 Bank clerk 38 Shop owner 39 Chairman of a large company 40 Skilled worker in a factory 41 Farm laborer 42 Secretary 43 City bus driver 44 Unskilled worker in a factory 45 Cabinet minister REASONABLE SALARY FOR DIFFERENT JOBS 46 Bricklayer 47 Doctor in general practice 48 Bank clerk 49 Shop owner 50 Chairman of a large company 51 Skilled worker in a factory 52 Farm laborer 53 Secretary 54 City bus driver 55 Unskilled worker in a factory 56 Cabinet minister IMPORTANT FACTORS DECIDING THE SALARY 57 Responsibility 58 Complex and difficult job 59 Years of studying 60 Practical experience 61 Supervision 62 Age 63 Marital status 64 Sex 65 Children 66 Support a family decently 67 Dangerous job 68 Dirty and unpleasant working conditions 69 Demand in labour market 70 Influence of trade unions STATEMENTS 71 Income differences too large 72 Reduce income differences 73 More chances for children from poor families to go to university 74 Provide jobs for all 75 Less benefits for poor 76 Decent standard of living for the unemployed 77 Guaranteed basic income TAXES 78 Taxes for those with high incomes 79 Taxes for those with middle incomes 80 Taxes for those with low incomes 81 Share of income CONFLICTS BETWEEN DIFFERENT SOCIAL GROUPS 82 Poor people and rich people 83 Working class and middle class 84 Unemployed and people with jobs 85 Management and workers 86 Farmers and city people 87 Young people and older people 88 Immigrants and Swedes 89 Men and women 90 Social position 91 Gain from increased equality of incomes 92 Fathers occupation 93 Father: SEI-group 94 Father selfemployed or employed 95 First job after finished full-time education 96 First job: SEI-group 97 First job selfemployed or employed 98 Present occupation 99 Present occupation: SEI-group 100 Selfemployed or employed in present occupation 101 Public or private sector 102 Fathers vs own status 103 Education 104 Monthly income 105 Parents nationality 106 Political party 107 Marital status 108 Spouses occupation 109 Spouse: SEI-group 110 Spouse selfemployed 111 Spouses monthly income 112 Answer 113 Infl 114 V96

VAR 1  SSD STUDY NUMBER-0297                       Loc 1  width 4


SSD Study Number-0297


VAR 2 SSD EDITION NUMBER-1 Loc 5 width 1 SSD Edition Number The number identifying the release edition of this dataset. 1. November 1992
VAR 3 SSD PART NUMBER-001 Loc 6 width 3 SSD Part Number The number identifying this part of a 1-part study.
VAR 4 ID-NUMBER Loc 9 width 7 ID-number
VAR 5 WEIGHT Loc 16 width 1 Weight Remark: A subsample was drawn among those who had still not responded after two subsequent reminders. 50% of them were selected for telephone interviewing, following the normal practices of Statistics Sweden. All respondents in the subsample has accordingly been given the weight 2. In order to keep the representativeness of the sample, all calculations should be made using the weight. Kod: 1 2 Frek: 583 166
VAR 6 SEX Loc 17 width 1 Sex 381 1. Male 368 2. Female
VAR 7 MARITAL STATUS Loc 18 width 1 Marital status 218 1. Unmarried 226 2. Married man 7 3. Married woman not cohabiting with her husband 59 4. Divorced 25 5. Widow/widower 210 7. Married woman cohabit with her husband 4 8. Child under 18 years
VAR 8 AGE Loc 19 width 2 Age 19. 19 year . . 75. 75 year Kod: 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 Frek: 12 11 8 16 15 15 12 16 18 20 14 12 12 14 Kod: 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 Frek: 14 15 14 14 9 16 23 15 18 15 11 21 11 16 Kod: 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 Frek: 16 15 12 16 17 18 5 10 14 10 11 12 15 13 Kod: 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 Frek: 12 14 19 9 7 14 6 11 10 13 12 11 6 7 Kod: 75 Frek: 7
VAR 9 COUNTY Loc 21 width 2 County 135 01. Stockholms län 18 03. Uppsala län 24 04. Södermanlands län 46 05. Östergötlands län 26 06. Jönköpings län 18 07. Kronobergs län 21 08. Kalmar län 7 09. Gotlands län 11 10. Blekinge län 23 11. Kristianstads län 70 12. Malmöhus län 21 13. Hallands län 55 14. Göteborgs och Bohus län 33 15. Älvsborgs län 26 16. Skaraborgs län 28 17. Värmlands län 28 18. Örebro län 17 19. Västmanlands län 27 20. Kopparbergs län 28 21. Gävleborgs län 25 22. Västernorrlands län 13 23. Jämtlands län 20 24. Västerbottens län 29 25. Norrbottens län
VAR 10 NATION Loc 23 width 2 alphabetic Nation This is an alphabetic variable.
VAR 11 REGION Loc 25 width 1 Region Remark: "Län" approximative to english county 135 1. Stockholm: Stockholms län 133 2. East mid: Uppsala, Södermanlands, Östergötlands, örebro and Västmanlands län 72 3. Småland and Gotland: Jönköpings, Kronobergs, Kalmar and Gotlands län 104 4. South: Blekinge, Kristianstads and Malmöhus län 135 5. West: Hallands, Göteborgs- and Bohus, Älsborgs and Skaraborgs län 83 6. North mid: Värmlands, Kopparbergs and Gävleborgs län 38 7. Mid north: Västernorrlands and Jämtlands län 49 8. North: Västerbottens and Norrbottens län
VAR 12 H-REGION Loc 26 width 1 H-region 131 1. Stockholm: Stockholm including the suburb municipalities 270 3. Urban 1: Municipalities (MC) with more than 90 000 inhabitants within an area of 30 kilometers radius from the MC centre 147 4. Urban 2: MC:s with more than 27 000 inhabitants and less than 90 000 inhabitants within an area of 30 kilometers radius of the MC centre and in the the same time with more than 300 000 inhabitants within 100 kilometers radius of the MC centre 46 5. Rural 1: MC:s with more than 27 000 inhabitants and less than 90 000 inhabitants within an area of 30 kilometers radius of the MC centra and in the same time with less than 300 000 inhabitants within 100 kilometers radius of the MC centre 56 6. Rural 2: MC:s with less than 27 000 inhabitants within an area of 30 kilometers radius of the MC centre 55 8. Göteborg region: Göteborg including the suburb municipalities 44 9. Malmö etc region: Malmö, Lund, Trelleborg including the suburb municipalities
VAR 13 AHEAD: WEALTHY FAMILY 1A Loc 27 width 1 MD=9 Q.1. To begin, we have some questions about opportunities for getting ahead in life. Please tick one box for the alternative most in line with your opinion. Q.1a. How important is coming from a wealthy family for getting ahead in life? 22 1. Essential 90 2. Very important 259 3. Fairly important 240 4. Not very important 90 5. Not important at all 18 8. Don't know 30 9. No answer
VAR 14 AHEAD: EDUCAT PARENTS 1B Loc 28 width 1 MD=9 Q.1b. How important is having well educated parents for getting ahead in life? <See Q.1 for complete question text> 18 1. Essential 147 2. Very important 310 3. Fairly important 165 4. Not very important 65 5. Not important at all 16 8. Don't know 28 9. No answer
VAR 15 AHEAD: GOOD EDUCATION 1C Loc 29 width 1 MD=9 Q.1c. How important is having good education yourself for getting ahead in life? <See Q.1 for complete question text> 86 1. Essential 418 2. Very important 204 3. Fairly important 15 4. Not very important 5 5. Not important at all 4 8. Don't know 17 9. No answer
VAR 16 AHEAD: AMBITION 1D Loc 30 width 1 MD=9 Q.1d. How important is having ambition for getting ahead in life? <See Q.1 for complete question text> 161 1. Essential 424 2. Very important 119 3. Fairly important 9 4. Not very important 4 5. Not important at all 12 8. Don't know 20 9. No answer
VAR 17 AHEAD: NATURAL ABILITY 1 Loc 31 width 1 MD=9 Q.1e. How important is natural ability for getting ahead in life? <See Q.1 for complete question text> 57 1. Essential 270 2. Very important 338 3. Fairly important 41 4. Not very important 7 5. Not important at all 9 8. Don't know 27 9. No answer
VAR 18 AHEAD: HARD WORK 1F Loc 32 width 1 MD=9 Q.1f. How important is hard work for getting ahead in life? <See Q.1 for complete question text> 123 1. Essential 366 2. Very important 198 3. Fairly important 27 4. Not very important 11 5. Not important at all 8 8. Don't know 16 9. No answer
VAR 19 AHEAD: KNOWING PEOPLE 1G Loc 33 width 1 MD=9 Q.1g. How important is knowing the right people for getting ahead in life? <See Q.1 for complete question text> 53 1. Essential 217 2. Very important 287 3. Fairly important 122 4. Not very important 28 5. Not important at all 15 8. Don't know 27 9. No answer
VAR 20 AHEAD: POL CONNECTION 1H Loc 34 width 1 MD=9 Q.1h. How important is having political connections for getting ahead in life? <See Q.1 for complete question text> 17 1. Essential 50 2. Very important 122 3. Fairly important 299 4. Not very important 182 5. Not important at all 52 8. Don't know 27 9. No answer
VAR 21 AHEAD: RACE 1I Loc 35 width 1 MD=9 Q.1i. How important is a person's race for getting ahead in life? <See Q.1 for complete question text> 20 1. Essential 50 2. Very important 153 3. Fairly important 207 4. Not very important 235 5. Not important at all 58 8. Don't know 26 9. No answer
VAR 22 AHEAD: RELIGION 1J Loc 36 width 1 MD=9 Q.1j. How important is a person's religion for getting ahead in life? <See Q.1 for complete question text> 6 1. Essential 17 2. Very important 51 3. Fairly important 225 4. Not very important 353 5. Not important at all 70 8. Don't know 27 9. No answer
VAR 23 AHEAD: PART OF COUNTRY 1 Loc 37 width 1 MD=9 Q.1k. How important is the part of the country a person comes from for getting ahead in life? <See Q.1 for complete question text> 5 1. Essential 14 2. Very important 63 3. Fairly important 215 4. Not very important 390 5. Not important at all 36 8. Don't know 26 9. No answer
VAR 24 AHEAD: GENDER 1L Loc 38 width 1 MD=9 Q.1l. How important is being a man or a woman for getting ahead in life? <See Q.1 for complete question text> 17 1. Essential 56 2. Very important 182 3. Fairly important 225 4. Not very important 195 5. Not important at all 46 8. Don't know 28 9. No answer
VAR 25 AHEAD: POL BELIEFS 1M Loc 39 width 1 MD=9 Q.1m. How important is a person's political beliefs for getting ahead in life? <See Q.1 for complete question text> 11 1. Essential 25 2. Very important 121 3. Fairly important 267 4. Not very important 248 5. Not important at all 51 8. Don't know 26 9. No answer
VAR 26 LIVING STANDARD 2 Loc 40 width 1 MD=9 Q.2. The way things are in Sweden, people like me and my family have a good chance of improving our standard of living. Please tick one box for the alternative most in line with your opinion. 7 1. Strongly agree 143 2. Agree 319 3. Neither agree nor disagree 169 4. Disagree 55 5. Strongly disagree 54 8. Don't know 2 9. No answer
VAR 27 DIFFERENCES IN PAY 3 Loc 41 width 1 MD=9 Q.3. Some people earn a lot of money while others do not earn very much at all. In order to get people to work hard, do you think large differences in pay are ... 116 1. Absolutely necessary 353 2. Probably necessary 159 3. Probably not necessary 77 4. Definitely not necessary 40 8. Don't know 4 9. No answer
VAR 28 EXTRA RESPONSIBILITY 4A Loc 42 width 1 MD=9 Q.4. Do you agree or disagree with each of these statements? Please for each statement tick the box for the alternative most in line with your opinion. Q.4a. People would not want to take extra responsibility at work unless they were paid extra for it 135 1. Strongly agree 423 2. Agree 94 3. Neither agree nor disagree 68 4. Disagree 10 5. Strongly disagree 12 8. Don't know 7 9. No answer
VAR 29 GET QUALIFICATION 4B Loc 43 width 1 MD=9 Q.4b. Workers would not bother to get skills and qualifications unless they were paid extra for having them. <See Q.4 for complete question text> 109 1. Strongly agree 395 2. Agree 124 3. Neither agree nor disagree 85 4. Disagree 11 5. Strongly disagree 15 8. Don't know 10 9. No answer
VAR 30 INEQUAL BENEFITS RICH 4C Loc 44 width 1 MD=9 Q.4c. Inequality continues to exist because it benefits the rich and powerful. <See Q.4 for complete question text> 140 1. Strongly agree 220 2. Agree 173 3. Neither agree nor disagree 115 4. Disagree 32 5. Strongly disagree 58 8. Don't know 11 9. No answer
VAR 31 NONE STUDY FOR YEARS 4D Loc 45 width 1 MD=9 Q.4d. No one would study for years to become a lawyer or doctor unless they expected to earn a lot more than ordinary workers. <See Q.4 for complete question text> 179 1. Strongly agree 342 2. Agree 103 3. Neither agree nor disagree 83 4. Disagree 14 5. Strongly disagree 21 8. Don't know 7 9. No answer
VAR 32 NECESSARY PROSPERITY 4E Loc 46 width 1 MD=9 Q.4e. Large differences in income are necessary for Sweden's prosperity. <See Q.4 for complete question text> 36 1. Strongly agree 169 2. Agree 206 3. Neither agree nor disagree 201 4. Disagree 61 5. Strongly disagree 65 8. Don't know 11 9. No answer
VAR 33 GOOD BUSINESS PROFITS 4F Loc 47 width 1 MD=9 Q.4f. Allowing business to make good profits is the best way to improve everyone's standard of living. <See Q.4 for complete question text> 58 1. Strongly agree 227 2. Agree 185 3. Neither agree nor disagree 143 4. Disagree 27 5. Strongly disagree 97 8. Don't know 12 9. No answer
VAR 34 PEOPLE JOIN TOGETHER 4G Loc 48 width 1 MD=9 Q.4g. Inequality continues to exist because ordinary people don't join together to get rid of it. <See Q.4 for complete question text> 53 1. Strongly agree 171 2. Agree 186 3. Neither agree nor disagree 177 4. Disagree 45 5. Strongly disagree 105 8. Don't know 12 9. No answer
VAR 35 EARNS: BRICKLAYER 5A Loc 49 width 5 MD= 0 Q.5. What do you think people in these jobs actually earn? Please write in how much you think they usually earn per month before taxes. Q.5a. A bricklayer 06000. 60 000 SEK . . 61300. 61 300 SEK 1 99999. More than 100 000 SEK 72 00000. No answer Kod: 0 6000 8000 9000 10000 11000 11500 12000 Frek: 72 1 1 2 23 19 3 56 Kod: 12500 13000 13500 14000 14400 14500 15000 15002 Frek: 3 47 4 88 1 3 195 1 Kod: 16000 17000 17500 18000 19000 20000 21000 22400 Frek: 69 51 1 53 4 38 1 1 Kod: 23000 25000 30000 61300 99999 Frek: 1 7 2 1 1
VAR 36 EARNS: DOCTOR 5B Loc 54 width 5 MD= 0 Q.5b. A doctor in general practice <See Q.5 for complete question text> 02200. 2 200 SEK . . 75000. 75 000 SEK 3 99999. More than 100 000 SEK 70 00000. No answer Kod: 0 2200 9500 10000 12000 12500 12800 13000 Frek: 70 1 2 2 3 1 1 5 Kod: 14000 14500 15000 16000 16500 17000 17500 18000 Frek: 6 1 21 25 1 12 1 37 Kod: 18500 19000 20000 21000 22000 22500 23000 24000 Frek: 1 10 110 6 40 1 18 13 Kod: 25000 26000 27000 27500 28000 29000 30000 32000 Frek: 154 4 10 1 16 1 101 1 Kod: 35000 40000 40001 45000 50000 60000 70000 75000 Frek: 34 19 1 5 6 3 1 1 Kod: 99999 Frek: 3
VAR 37 EARNS: BANK CLERK 5C Loc 59 width 5 MD= 0 Q.5c. A bank clerk <See Q.5 for complete question text> 07000. 7 000 SEK . . 80000. 80 000 SEK 70 00000. No answer Kod: 0 7000 8000 8500 9000 9500 9900 10000 Frek: 70 1 3 1 19 5 1 71 Kod: 10500 11000 11500 12000 12500 13000 13500 14000 Frek: 11 86 7 171 9 76 4 42 Kod: 14500 15000 16000 17000 17500 18000 19000 20000 Frek: 1 88 18 15 1 16 2 13 Kod: 20008 23000 24000 25000 26000 30000 40000 45000 Frek: 1 1 1 7 1 2 1 1 Kod: 50000 60000 80000 Frek: 1 1 1
VAR 38 EARNS: SHOP OWNER 5D Loc 64 width 5 MD= 0 Q.5d. An owner of a small shop <See Q.5 for complete question text> 01000. 1 000 SEK . . 60000. 60 000 SEK 102 00000. No answer Kod: 0 1000 5000 6000 7000 8000 8500 9000 Frek: 102 1 1 1 5 25 3 11 Kod: 10000 10500 11000 11500 12000 12500 13000 14000 Frek: 83 1 40 1 85 6 40 32 Kod: 15000 15500 16000 16500 17000 17500 18000 19000 Frek: 151 1 19 3 20 2 25 3 Kod: 20000 21000 22000 23000 25000 28000 30000 60000 Frek: 64 1 2 1 12 1 6 1
VAR 39 EARNS: CHAIRMAN 5E Loc 69 width 5 MD= 0 Q.5e. A chairman of a large company <See Q.5 for complete question text> 01500. 1 500 SEK . . 90000. 90 000 SEK 48 99999. More than 100 000 SEK 80 00000. No answer Kod: 0 1500 4000 5000 6000 7000 8000 10000 Frek: 80 1 1 2 1 1 2 7 Kod: 11000 12000 14000 15000 15500 16000 17000 18000 Frek: 1 2 3 21 1 2 7 14 Kod: 18500 19000 20000 21000 22000 22500 23000 24000 Frek: 2 5 61 5 7 2 1 1 Kod: 25000 26000 27000 27500 28000 30000 32000 35000 Frek: 76 1 4 2 5 98 3 48 Kod: 36000 37000 37500 38000 40000 45000 46000 47500 Frek: 2 1 1 2 68 12 1 1 Kod: 48000 50000 55000 60000 65000 67500 70000 75000 Frek: 2 87 3 27 2 1 8 7 Kod: 80000 85000 90000 99999 Frek: 6 2 1 48
VAR 40 EARNS: SKILLED WORKER 5F Loc 74 width 5 MD= 0 Q.5f. A skilled worker in a factory <See Q.5 for complete question text> 08000. 8 000 SEK . . 35000. 35 000 SEK 1 99999. More than 100 000 SEK 69 00000. No answer Kod: 0 8000 8500 9000 9500 10000 10500 11000 Frek: 69 3 1 5 1 35 5 38 Kod: 11500 12000 12500 13000 13500 14000 14500 14700 Frek: 1 127 11 127 4 111 3 1 Kod: 15000 16000 17000 17500 18000 18500 19000 20000 Frek: 126 32 15 1 11 1 4 8 Kod: 21000 22000 25000 30000 35000 99999 Frek: 1 1 2 3 1 1
VAR 41 EARNS: FARM LABORER 5G Loc 79 width 5 MD= 0 Q.5g. A farm laborer <See Q.5 for complete question text> 04000. 4 000 SEK . . 95000. 95 000 SEK 85 00000. No answer Kod: 0 4000 5000 6000 7000 8000 8500 9000 Frek: 85 1 4 6 7 34 5 56 Kod: 9100 9500 9800 10000 10500 11000 11500 12000 Frek: 1 5 1 178 8 79 4 144 Kod: 12500 13000 13500 13800 14000 15000 16000 17000 Frek: 5 35 2 1 16 39 6 3 Kod: 18000 20000 25000 80000 95000 Frek: 6 14 2 1 1
VAR 42 EARNS: SECRETARY 5H Loc 84 width 5 MD= 0 Q.5h. A secretary <See Q.5 for complete question text> 05000. 5 000 SEK . . 25000. 25 000 SEK 73 00000. No answer Kod: 0 5000 6000 7500 8000 8500 9000 9200 Frek: 73 1 1 1 6 1 34 1 Kod: 9500 9900 10000 10500 11000 11500 12000 12500 Frek: 10 1 103 8 126 10 154 8 Kod: 13000 13500 14000 15000 15500 16000 17000 18000 Frek: 88 2 39 54 1 6 4 7 Kod: 19000 20000 24000 25000 Frek: 1 5 1 3
VAR 43 EARNS: BUS DRIVER 5I Loc 89 width 5 MD= 0 Q.5i. A city bus driver <See Q.5 for complete question text> 01300. 1 300 SEK . . 20000. 20 000 SEK 72 00000. No answer Kod: 0 1300 6000 8000 8500 9000 9800 10000 Frek: 72 1 2 3 2 25 1 82 Kod: 10006 10500 11000 11500 11700 11750 11800 12000 Frek: 1 7 104 12 1 1 3 203 Kod: 12500 13000 13500 14000 14500 15000 16000 17000 Frek: 15 106 3 49 3 38 9 2 Kod: 18000 19000 20000 Frek: 1 1 2
VAR 44 EARNS: UNSKILLED 5J Loc 94 width 5 MD= 0 Q.5j. An unskilled worker in a factory <See Q.5 for complete question text> 01200. 1 200 SEK . . 90000. 90 000 SEK 71 00000. No answer Kod: 0 1200 5000 6500 7000 7500 8000 8500 Frek: 71 1 1 1 4 1 21 3 Kod: 9000 9100 9500 9800 10000 10500 10800 11000 Frek: 62 1 9 1 156 2 1 129 Kod: 11500 12000 12500 12600 13000 13500 14000 15000 Frek: 14 146 11 1 57 1 22 23 Kod: 16000 17000 17500 18000 20000 90000 Frek: 4 1 2 1 1 1
VAR 45 EARNS: MINISTER 5K Loc 99 width 5 MD= 0 Q.5k. A cabinet minister <See Q.5 for complete question text> 03000. 3 000 SEK . . 90000. 90 000 SEK 14 99999. More than 100 000 SEK 72 00000. No answer Kod: 0 3000 4500 10000 15000 18000 19500 20000 Frek: 72 1 1 1 4 2 1 16 Kod: 20001 21000 22000 23000 24000 25000 26000 27000 Frek: 1 1 5 7 3 72 5 19 Kod: 27500 28000 29000 29200 30000 30200 32000 32500 Frek: 2 12 2 1 129 1 14 1 Kod: 33000 35000 36000 37000 38000 40000 41000 42000 Frek: 2 99 2 5 10 127 1 4 Kod: 42500 43000 45000 47000 47500 48000 50000 52000 Frek: 2 2 25 1 1 4 48 1 Kod: 55000 60000 65000 70000 75000 80000 85000 90000 Frek: 2 12 2 3 3 2 1 3 Kod: 99999 Frek: 14
VAR 46 SHLD EARN: BRICKLAYER 6A Loc 104 width 5 MD= 0 Q.6. How much do you think people in these jobs ought to earn? Please write in how much you think they should earn each month before taxes regardless of what they actually get. Q.6a. A bricklayer 05000. 5 000 SEK . . 70002. 70 002 SEK 113 00000. No answer Kod: 0 5000 6000 10000 11000 11500 12000 12500 Frek: 113 1 1 20 8 1 51 3 Kod: 13000 14000 15000 15200 15500 16000 17000 17500 Frek: 58 64 228 1 1 45 38 1 Kod: 18000 19000 20000 22000 25000 30000 32000 70002 Frek: 47 6 53 1 5 1 1 1
VAR 47 SHLD EARN: DOCTOR 6B Loc 109 width 5 MD= 0 Q.6b. A doctor in general practice <See Q.6 for complete question text> 08000. 8 000 SEK . . 80000. 80 000 SEK 1 99999. More than 100 000 SEK 108 00000. No answer Kod: 0 8000 9000 10000 12000 13000 14000 14500 Frek: 108 1 2 1 3 2 4 1 Kod: 15000 15500 16000 17000 18000 19000 19500 20000 Frek: 38 1 16 27 42 14 1 147 Kod: 21000 22000 22500 23000 24000 25000 26000 27000 Frek: 3 17 1 7 4 144 2 7 Kod: 27500 28000 30000 32000 34000 35000 38000 40000 Frek: 1 6 89 1 1 28 1 15 Kod: 40009 45000 50000 51000 60000 75000 80000 99999 Frek: 1 2 5 1 2 1 1 1
VAR 48 SHLD EARN: BANK CLERK 6C Loc 114 width 5 MD= 0 Q.6c. A bank clerk <See Q.6 for complete question text> 01000. 1 000 SEK . . 45000. 45 000 SEK 111 00000. No answer Kod: 0 1000 7000 8000 9000 10000 10400 10500 Frek: 111 1 1 4 3 42 1 4 Kod: 11000 11500 12000 12500 13000 13500 14000 14001 Frek: 40 4 141 2 84 2 56 1 Kod: 14500 15000 15500 16000 16500 17000 18000 19000 Frek: 1 162 1 19 1 15 17 2 Kod: 20000 22000 25000 30000 40000 41000 45000 Frek: 20 1 6 4 1 1 1
VAR 49 SHLD EARN: SHOP OWNER 6D Loc 119 width 5 MD= 0 Q.6d. An owner of a small shop <See Q.6 for complete question text> 06000. 6 000 SEK . . 80000. 80 000 SEK 128 00000. No answer Kod: 0 6000 8000 10000 10500 11000 11500 12000 Frek: 128 2 1 31 1 10 2 60 Kod: 13000 14000 15000 16000 16500 17000 17500 18000 Frek: 37 41 214 39 1 16 1 35 Kod: 18500 19000 20000 21000 22000 22500 24000 25000 Frek: 1 1 88 1 4 1 2 17 Kod: 28000 30000 40000 80000 Frek: 2 11 1 1
VAR 50 SHLD EARN: CHAIRMAN 6E Loc 124 width 5 MD= 0 Q.6e. The chairman of a large company <See Q.6 for complete question text> 01500. 1 500 SEK . . 85000. 85 000 SEK 22 99999. More than 100 000 SEK 126 00000. No answer Kod: 0 1500 2000 3000 4000 5000 6000 8000 Frek: 126 2 1 1 2 4 2 2 Kod: 9000 10000 11000 12000 13000 14000 15000 16000 Frek: 3 15 3 7 6 6 44 9 Kod: 16500 16700 17000 17500 18000 19000 20000 21000 Frek: 1 1 15 1 26 6 129 1 Kod: 22000 22500 23000 24000 25000 26000 27500 28000 Frek: 3 1 2 3 91 1 1 5 Kod: 30000 32000 35000 37000 37500 38000 40000 45000 Frek: 75 1 28 1 1 1 36 2 Kod: 49900 50000 55000 60000 65000 70000 75000 80000 Frek: 1 35 1 9 1 2 11 1 Kod: 85000 99999 Frek: 1 22
VAR 51 SHLD EARN: SKILLED 6F Loc 129 width 5 MD= 0 Q.6f. A skilled worker in a factory <See Q.6 for complete question text> 00100. 100 SEK . . 35000. 35 000 SEK 114 00000. No answer Kod: 0 100 1400 8000 8500 10000 10800 11000 Frek: 114 1 1 1 1 13 1 7 Kod: 11500 12000 12500 13000 13500 14000 14500 15000 Frek: 1 70 2 76 1 73 2 208 Kod: 15500 16000 17000 17500 18000 19000 20000 21000 Frek: 4 42 29 1 44 3 38 2 Kod: 22000 25000 30000 35000 Frek: 3 9 1 1
VAR 52 SHLD EARN: FARM LAB 6G Loc 134 width 5 MD= 0 Q.6g. A farm laborer <See Q.6 for complete question text> 01200. 1 200 SEK . . 30000. 30 000 SEK 124 00000. No answer Kod: 0 1200 6000 7500 8000 9000 9800 10000 Frek: 124 1 1 1 2 4 1 48 Kod: 10400 10500 11000 11500 12000 12500 13000 13500 Frek: 1 2 28 1 109 5 81 1 Kod: 14000 14500 15000 15500 16000 17000 17500 18000 Frek: 68 1 169 1 20 11 2 14 Kod: 19000 20000 25000 30000 Frek: 2 42 7 2
VAR 53 SHLD EARN: SECRETARY 6H Loc 139 width 5 MD= 0 Q.6h. A secretary <See Q.6 for complete question text> 06000. 6 000 SEK . . 35000. 35 000 SEK 113 00000. No answer Kod: 0 6000 8000 9000 9500 10000 10500 11000 Frek: 113 2 4 6 5 47 4 57 Kod: 11500 11700 12000 12500 13000 13500 14000 14500 Frek: 3 1 131 5 102 3 62 1 Kod: 15000 16000 17000 18000 19000 20000 22000 24000 Frek: 148 13 7 11 2 15 1 1 Kod: 25000 30000 35000 Frek: 3 1 1
VAR 54 SHLD EARN: BUS DRIVER 6I Loc 144 width 5 MD= 0 Q.6i. A city bus driver <See Q.6 for complete question text> 05000. 5 000 SEK . . 30000. 30 000 SEK 113 00000. No answer Kod: 0 5000 7000 8000 8500 9000 10000 10400 Frek: 113 1 1 3 1 3 49 1 Kod: 11000 11500 11800 12000 12500 13000 13500 13800 Frek: 40 3 1 143 7 107 3 1 Kod: 14000 14500 15000 16000 17000 17500 18000 19000 Frek: 59 1 153 14 12 1 13 2 Kod: 20000 25000 30000 Frek: 13 3 1
VAR 55 SHLD EARN: UNSKILLED 6J Loc 149 width 5 MD= 0 Q.6j. An unskilled worker in a factory <See Q.6 for complete question text> 06000. 6 000 SEK . . 90000. 90 000 SEK 113 00000. No answer Kod: 0 6000 6500 7000 8000 9000 9500 10000 Frek: 113 1 1 2 12 20 1 94 Kod: 10500 11000 11500 12000 12001 12500 13000 13500 Frek: 2 61 8 165 1 3 86 4 Kod: 14000 14500 15000 16000 17000 17500 18000 18500 Frek: 47 2 83 9 7 2 7 1 Kod: 19000 20000 25000 75000 90000 Frek: 1 13 1 1 1
VAR 56 SHLD EARN: MINISTER 6K Loc 154 width 5 MD= 0 Q.6k. A cabinet minister <See Q.6 for complete question text> 05000. 5 000 SEK . . 80003. 80 003 SEK 8 99999. More than 100 000 SEK 114 00000. No answer Kod: 0 5000 6000 8000 8500 10000 11000 12000 Frek: 114 2 1 1 1 14 2 3 Kod: 13000 14000 15000 16000 16700 17000 17500 18000 Frek: 1 5 45 8 1 10 1 16 Kod: 19000 19500 20000 21000 22000 23000 24000 25000 Frek: 4 1 131 1 12 5 4 115 Kod: 27000 28000 29000 30000 32500 33000 33433 35000 Frek: 3 10 1 87 1 2 1 33 Kod: 38000 40000 42000 45000 47500 50000 55000 60000 Frek: 1 54 2 5 1 31 1 5 Kod: 75000 80000 80003 99999 Frek: 2 2 1 8
VAR 57 PAY: RESPONSIBILITY 7A Loc 159 width 1 MD=9 Q.7. In deciding how much people ought to be paid, how important should each of these things be? For each question tick the box most in line with your opinion? Q.7a. How much responsibility goes with the job? 88 1. Should be the single most important thing 448 2. Should be very important 177 3. Should be fairly important 12 4. Should not be very important 9 5. Should not matter at all 10 8. Don't know 5 9. No answer
VAR 58 PAY:DIFFICULT/COMPLEX 7B Loc 160 width 1 MD=9 Q.7b. How complex and difficult the job is? <See Q.7 for complete question text> 88 1. Should be the single most important thing 449 2. Should be very important 167 3. Should be fairly important 16 4. Should not be very important 9 5. Should not matter at all 15 8. Don't know 5 9. No answer
VAR 59 PAY: YEARS STUDYING 7C Loc 161 width 1 MD=9 Q.7c. The number of years studying? <See Q.7 for complete question text> 24 1. Should be the single most important thing 189 2. Should be very important 333 3. Should be fairly important 150 4. Should not be very important 28 5. Should not matter at all 18 8. Don't know 7 9. No answer
VAR 60 PAY: EXPERIENCE 7D Loc 162 width 1 MD=9 Q.7d. How much practical experience it takes? <See Q.7 for complete question text> 43 1. Should be the single most important thing 325 2. Should be very important 328 3. Should be fairly important 24 4. Should not be very important 5 5. Should not matter at all 15 8. Don't know 9 9. No answer
VAR 61 PAY: SUPERVISION 7E Loc 163 width 1 MD=9 Q.7e. Whether the job requires supervising others? <See Q.7 for complete question text> 48 1. Should be the single most important thing 349 2. Should be very important 274 3. Should be fairly important 44 4. Should not be very important 13 5. Should not matter at all 11 8. Don't know 10 9. No answer
VAR 62 PAY: AGE 7F Loc 164 width 1 MD=9 Q.7f. How old the worker is? <See Q.7 for complete question text> 10 1. Should be the single most important thing 67 2. Should be very important 179 3. Should be fairly important 319 4. Should not be very important 147 5. Should not matter at all 16 8. Don't know 11 9. No answer
VAR 63 PAY: MARITAL STATUS 7G Loc 165 width 1 MD=9 Q.7g. Whether he or she is married? <See Q.7 for complete question text> 4 1. Should be the single most important thing 8 2. Should be very important 26 3. Should be fairly important 145 4. Should not be very important 544 5. Should not matter at all 16 8. Don't know 6 9. No answer
VAR 64 PAY: GENDER 7H Loc 166 width 1 MD=9 Q.7h. Whether the worker is a man or a woman? <See Q.7 for complete question text> 4 1. Should be the single most important thing 6 2. Should be very important 10 3. Should be fairly important 137 4. Should not be very important 570 5. Should not matter at all 15 8. Don't know 7 9. No answer
VAR 65 PAY: SUPPORT CHILDREN 7I Loc 167 width 1 MD=9 Q.7i. Whether he or she has children to support? <See Q.7 for complete question text> 10 1. Should be the single most important thing 32 2. Should be very important 95 3. Should be fairly important 154 4. Should not be very important 421 5. Should not matter at all 27 8. Don't know 10 9. No answer
VAR 66 PAY: DECENT LIFE 7J Loc 168 width 1 MD=9 Q.7j. What it takes to support a family decently? <See Q.7 for complete question text> 40 1. Should be the single most important thing 158 2. Should be very important 190 3. Should be fairly important 96 4. Should not be very important 202 5. Should not matter at all 48 8. Don't know 15 9. No answer
VAR 67 PAY: DANGEROUS JOB 7K Loc 169 width 1 MD=9 Q.7k. How dangerous the job is? <See Q.7 for complete question text> 96 1. Should be the single most important thing 394 2. Should be very important 212 3. Should be fairly important 18 4. Should not be very important 7 5. Should not matter at all 17 8. Don't know 5 9. No answer
VAR 68 PAY: WORK CONDITIONS 7L Loc 170 width 1 MD=9 Q.7l. How dirty and unpleasant the working conditions are? <See Q.7 for complete question text> 54 1. Should be the single most important thing 274 2. Should be very important 323 3. Should be fairly important 57 4. Should not be very important 13 5. Should not matter at all 21 8. Don't know 7 9. No answer
VAR 69 PAY: DEMAND IN LABOUR 7M Loc 171 width 1 MD=9 Q.7m. How great demand there is for their labour power in the market? <See Q.7 for complete question text> 22 1. Should be the single most important thing 161 2. Should be very important 235 3. Should be fairly important 205 4. Should not be very important 91 5. Should not matter at all 23 8. Don't know 12 9. No answer
VAR 70 PAY: UNION INFLUENCE 7N Loc 172 width 1 MD=9 Q.7n. The influence of trade unions? <See Q.7 for complete question text> 14 1. Should be the single most important thing 60 2. Should be very important 127 3. Should be fairly important 199 4. Should not be very important 276 5. Should not matter at all 65 8. Don't know 8 9. No answer
VAR 71 INCOME DIFF TOO LARGE 8A Loc 173 width 1 MD=9 Q.8. Do you agree or disagree with the following statements? Q.8a. Differences in income in Sweden are too large. 177 1. Strongly agree 255 2. Agree 159 3. Neither agree nor disagree 99 4. Disagree 36 5. Strongly disagree 20 8. Don't know 3 9. No answer
VAR 72 REDUCE INCOME DIFF 8B Loc 174 width 1 MD=9 Q.8b. It is the responsibility of the government/the parliament to reduce the differences in income between people with high incomes and those with low incomes. <See Q.8 for complete question text> 124 1. Strongly agree 254 2. Agree 128 3. Neither agree nor disagree 138 4. Disagree 70 5. Strongly disagree 30 8. Don't know 5 9. No answer
VAR 73 CHANCES GO TO UNIV 8C Loc 175 width 1 MD=9 Q.8c. The goverment/the parliament should provide more chances for children from poor families to go to university. <See Q.8 for complete question text> 143 1. Strongly agree 328 2. Agree 161 3. Neither agree nor disagree 55 4. Disagree 23 5. Strongly disagree 34 8. Don't know 5 9. No answer
VAR 74 JOB FOR EVERYONE 8D Loc 176 width 1 MD=9 Q.8d. The government/the parliament should provide a job for everyone who wants one. <See Q.8 for complete question text> 196 1. Strongly agree 329 2. Agree 124 3. Neither agree nor disagree 60 4. Disagree 16 5. Strongly disagree 20 8. Don't know 4 9. No answer
VAR 75 LESS BENEFITS 8E Loc 177 width 1 MD=9 Q.8e. The government/the parliament should spend less on benefits for the poor. <See Q.8 for complete question text> 16 1. Strongly agree 61 2. Agree 158 3. Neither agree nor disagree 274 4. Disagree 188 5. Strongly disagree 45 8. Don't know 7 9. No answer
VAR 76 LIVING STANDARD UNEMPL 8 Loc 178 width 1 MD=9 Q.8f. The government/the parliament should provide a decent standard of living for the unemployed. <See Q.8 for complete question text> 62 1. Strongly agree 359 2. Agree 199 3. Neither agree nor disagree 59 4. Disagree 25 5. Strongly disagree 37 8. Don't know 8 9. No answer
VAR 77 BASIC INCOME 8G Loc 179 width 1 MD=9 Q.8g. The government/the parliament should provide everyone with a guaranteed basic income. <See Q.8 for complete question text> 69 1. Strongly agree 230 2. Agree 173 3. Neither agree nor disagree 143 4. Disagree 76 5. Strongly disagree 53 8. Don't know 5 9. No answer
VAR 78 TAXES: HIGH INCOMES 9A Loc 180 width 1 MD=9 Q.9. Generally, how would you describe taxes in Sweden today? Q.9a. For those with high incomes, taxes ares... 53 1. Much too high 113 2. Too high 199 3. About right 223 4. Too low 79 5. Much too low 75 8. Don't know 7 9. No answer
VAR 79 TAXES: MIDDLE INCOMES 9B Loc 181 width 1 MD=9 Q.9b. For those with middle incomes, taxes are... <See Q.9 for complete question text> 82 1. Much too high 288 2. Too high 298 3. About right 5 4. Too low 5. Much too low 69 8. Don't know 7 9. No answer
VAR 80 TAXES: LOW INCOMES 9C Loc 182 width 1 MD=9 Q.9c. For those with low incomes, taxes are... <See Q.9 for complete question text> 247 1. Much too high 326 2. Too high 111 3. About right 2 4. Too low 5. Much too low 57 8. Don't know 6 9. No answer
VAR 81 TAX RATES: SHARE 10 Loc 183 width 1 MD=9 Q.10. Do you think that people with high incomes should pay a larger share of their income in taxes than those with low incomes, the same share, or a smaller share? 101 1. Much larger share 447 2. Larger share 161 3. The same share 8 4. Smaller share 5. Much smaller share 29 8. Don't know 3 9. No answer
VAR 82 CONFL: POOR VS RICH 11A Loc 184 width 1 MD=9 Q.11. In all countries there are differences or even conflicts between different social groups. In your opinion, in Sweden, how much conflict is there between ... Please tick the box most in line with your opinion. Q.11a. Poor people and rich people? 42 1. Very strong conflicts 169 2. Strong conflicts 440 3. Not very strong conflicts 51 4. No conflicts 41 8. Don't know 6 9. No answer
VAR 83 CONFL: WORKING-MIDDL 11B Loc 185 width 1 MD=9 Q.11b. The working class and the middle class? <See Q.11 for complete question text> 6 1. Very strong conflicts 53 2. Strong conflicts 497 3. Not very strong conflicts 149 4. No conflicts 38 8. Don't know 6 9. No answer
VAR 84 CONFL: UNEMPL-EMPL 11C Loc 186 width 1 MD=9 Q.11c. The unemployed and people with jobs? <See Q.11 for complete question text> 15 1. Very strong conflicts 92 2. Strong conflicts 423 3. Not very strong conflicts 141 4. No conflicts 72 8. Don't know 6 9. No answer
VAR 85 CONFL: MANAGEM-WORKER 11 Loc 187 width 1 MD=9 Q.11d. Management and workers? <See Q.11 for complete question text> 25 1. Very strong conflicts 164 2. Strong conflicts 424 3. Not very strong conflicts 68 4. No conflicts 58 8. Don't know 10 9. No answer
VAR 86 CONFL: FARMERS-CITY 11 Loc 188 width 1 MD=9 Q.11e. Farmers and city people? <See Q.11 for complete question text> 13 1. Very strong conflicts 85 2. Strong conflicts 413 3. Not very strong conflicts 166 4. No conflicts 66 8. Don't know 6 9. No answer
VAR 87 CONFL: YOUNG-OLD 11 Loc 189 width 1 MD=9 Q.11f. Young people and older people <See Q.11 for complete question text> 15 1. Very strong conflicts 86 2. Strong conflicts 422 3. Not very strong conflicts 173 4. No conflicts 46 8. Don't know 7 9. No answer
VAR 88 CONFL: IMMIGR-SWEDES 11G Loc 190 width 1 MD=9 Q.11g. Immigrants and Swedes? <See Q.11 for complete question text> 103 1. Very strong conflicts 313 2. Strong conflicts 252 3. Not very strong conflicts 24 4. No conflicts 52 8. Don't know 5 9. No answer
VAR 89 CONFL: MEN-WOMEN 11H Loc 191 width 1 MD=9 Q.11h. Men and women? <See Q.11 for complete question text> 14 1. Very strong conflicts 79 2. Strong conflicts 426 3. Not very strong conflicts 177 4. No conflicts 49 8. Don't know 4 9. No answer
VAR 90 PERCEPTION:SOCIAL POS 12 Loc 192 width 1 Q.12. In our society there are groups which tend to be towards the top and groups which tend to be towards the bottom. Here is a scale that runs from top to bottom. Were would you put yourself on this scale? Please tick one box! 36 0. Bottom 8 1. 31 2. 73 3. 123 4. 248 5. 134 6. 76 7. 14 8. 6 9. Top
VAR 91 GAIN INCOME EQUALITY 13 Loc 193 width 1 MD=9 Q.13. If there would be an increased equality of incomes in Sweden, some people would get higher incomes, and some would get lower incomes. Do you think that you would win or lose from such increased equality? 312 1. Win 142 5. Lose 282 8. Don't know 13 9. No answer
VAR 92 FATHERS OCCUPATION 14A Loc 194 width 3 MD=900 or GE 999 Q.14a. What occupation did your father have when you were 16? If your father did not have a job then, please give the job he used to have. Remark: This is a question with an open answer that has been coded according to the occupational classification NYK which is roughly comparable to the ISO-codings (International Standard Classification of Occupations). PROFESSIONAL, TECHNICAL AND RELATED WORK 10 001. Architects, civil engineers and civil engineering technicians 2 002. Electrical engineers and technicians 5 003. Electronics and teletechnical communications engineers and technicians 21 004. Mechanical engineers and technicians 4 005. Chemical engineers and technicians 1 006. Metallurgists, mining and petroleum engineers and technicians 7 007. Engineers and engineering technicians nec 2 008. Surveyors and cartographical engineers and technicians 4 009. Technical workers nec 1 022. Agricultural advisors 1 031. University and higher education teachers 5 032. Secondary education teachers (theoretical subjects) 6 033. Primary education teachers 2 034. Secondary education teachers (aesthetical-practical subjects) 5 035. Technical education teachers 1 037. Educational methods advisors 5 041. Ministers of religion 1 051. Judges and lawyers in courts of justice 2 053. Other jurists (private practice) 2 054. Legal advisors (in enterprises or other organizations) 1 061. Journalists, authors 1 062. Public relations and publicity officers 1 071. Sculptors, painters and commercial artists 1 075. Performing artists 1 076. Composers and musicians 1 077. Producers, directors, stage managers (film, theatre) HEALTH AND NURSING WORK, SOCIAL WORK 4 101. Physicians and surgeons 1 106. Attendants in psychiatric care 1 107. Assistant nurses and hospital aids 3 121. Dentists 1 131. Pharmacists ADMINISTRATIVE, MANAGERIAL AND CLERICAL WORK 3 201. Legislators and administrators (central government) 12 211. Business administrators 1 212. Organisation administrators 1 219. Business administrative workers nec 1 221. Personnel officers 1 231. Auditors 6 232. Financial managers, accountants 4 249. Clerical and related workers nec 2 251. Systems analysts, programmers 1 259. Computer processing workers (ADP) nec 5 292. Bank tellers and finance clerks 3 293. Insurance clerks 2 296. Forwarders, transport planners 4 297. Property managers SALES WORK 2 311. Advertising salesmen 1 312. Real estate and securities brokers 6 321. Buyers 27 331. Working proprietors, wholesale and retail trade 13 332. Salesmen (wholesale) 13 333. Shop assistants AGRICULTURAL, FORESTRY AND FISHING WORK 107 400. Working proprietors in agriculture and forestry 3 401. Horticultural farmers 3 403. Farm managers and supervisors 7 404. Forestry managers and supervisors 11 411. Agricultural workers 3 412. Livestock, dairy and poultry farm workers 3 431. Fishermen 17 441. Loggers MINING, QUARRYING AND PETROLEUM EXTRACTION WORK 6 501. Miners, quarrymen 2 509. Mining and quarrying workers nec 2 511. Well and diamond drillers TRANSPORT AND COMMUNICATIONS WORK 1 602. Ship pilots 3 603. Ships' engineers 2 611. Ships' deck ratings 1 612. Engine-room ratings 4 631. Railway engine drivers 3 640. Bus and taxi drivers 21 641. Lorry and pickup drivers 8 652. Railway conductors and yardmen 1 663. Railway station masters, train dispatchers 1 671. Postmasters, post office clerks 5 681. Mail sorting clerks and postmen 1 682. Messengers 1 689. Mail distributon clerks and messengers nec PRODUCTION WORK 2 711. Tailors 2 719. Tailoring and sewing workers nec 2 721. Shoemakers and shoe repairers 1 722. Shoe cutters, lasters and sewers 3 736. Blacksmiths, hammersmiths and forgers 2 737. Metal casters and moulders 8 739. Metal processing workers nec 1 742. Watchmakers 1 743. Opticians 8 751. Toolmakers, machinetool setters and operators 7 752. Machinery fitters 10 753. Machine assemblers and engine mechanics 1 754. Sheet-metal workers 5 755. Plumbers and pipe fitters 9 756. Welders and flame cutters 1 757. Structural metal prepares and erectors 2 758. Metal platers and coaters 5 759. Metal machine workers and building metal workers nec 7 761. Electrical fitters and wiremen 1 763. Electrical machinery assemblers and repairmen 1 764. Tele- and electronic repairmen and fitters 3 765. Electric linemen 3 772. Wood processing workers 1 773. Laminated wood and fibreboard workers 4 776. Cabinet makers and joiners 4 777. Woodworking machine operators 9 781. Building painters 2 782. Floor layers 1 783. Painters (others than building) 6 791. Bricklayers 21 793. Concrete workers 23 794. Construction carpenters 1 795. Insulators 6 799. Building and construction workers nec 1 801. Type-setters 1 802. Printing and photo engravers 2 819. Glass, pottery and tile workers nec 2 822. Bakers and pastry cooks 3 826. Butchers and meat preparers 2 827. Dairy workers 1 829. Food processing and tobacco workers nec 1 831. Chemical process workers 2 835. Plastic products makers 1 839. Chemical processing workers nec 2 841. Paper pulp preparers 2 842. Paper makers 2 843. Paper product makers 1 851. Cast concrete product makers 3 852. Tanners and fur dressers 1 854. Stone cutters and carvers 10 859. Other production and related workers nec 3 861. Stationary engine and related equipment operators 1 871. Crane and hoist operators 2 872. Earth-moving and related machinery operators 4 873. Truck and conveyor operators 2 881. Packers 6 882. Store and warehouse workers 1 891. Unskilled manual workers 3 901. Firefighters 2 902. Chimney sweeps 4 903. Policemen 3 904. Custom officials 1 905. Prison and reformatory officials 2 906. Watchmen 1 911. Catering supervisors 2 914. Waiters 1 915. Hotel managers, hotel receptionists 6 931. Building caretakers 2 939. Caretakers and cleaners nec 1 941. Hairdressers, beauticians 2 952. Pressers 1 961. Coaches, horse trainers 8 981. Officers 2 900. Workers reporting occupations unidentifiable or inadequately described 62 999. No answer
VAR 93 FATHER: SEI 14A Loc 197 width 2 MD=99 Q.14a(1). Father: SEI-group <See Q.14a for complete question text> 110 11. Unskilled employees in goods production 43 12. Unskilled employees in service production 114 21. Skilled employees in goods production 6 22. Skilled employees in service production 11 33. Assistant non-manual employees, lower level 60 36. Assistant non-manual employees, higher level 81 46. Intermediate non-manual employees 45 56. Professionals and other higher non-manual employees 13 57. Upper-level executives 8 60. Self employed professionals 89 79. Self-employed without employees, entrepeneurs 107 89. Medium-scale farmers 62 99. No answer
VAR 94 FATHER EMPLOYED 14C Loc 199 width 1 MD=9 Q.14c. Was your father self-employed, or did he work for someone else? 131 1. Selfemployed without employees 82 2. Selfemployed with employeed 478 3. Employed 58 9. No answer
VAR 95 FIRST JOB 15 Loc 200 width 3 MD=999 Q.15a. What was your own first job, the first job you had after you finished youl full-time education? Remark: This is a question with an open answer that has been coded according to the occupational classification NYK which is roughly comparable to the ISO-codings (International Standard Classifications of Occupations). PROFESSIONAL, TECHNICAL AND RELATED WORK 7 001. Architects, civil engineers and civil engineering technicians 002. Electrical engineers and technicians 2 003. Electronics and teletechnical communications engineers and technicians 3 004. Mechanical engineers and technicians 3 005. Chemical engineers and technicians 1 006. Metallurgists, mining and petroleum engineers and technicians 3 007. Engineers and engineering technicians nec 3 008. Surveyors and cartographical engineers and technicians 4 009. Technical workers nec 3 012. Laboratory technicians and assistants (not medical lab) 2 013. Laboratory assistants (medical lab) 1 015. Meterologists, hydrologists 2 016. Chemists, physicists, laboratory engineers 1 021. Biologists 2 022. Agricultural advisors 2 031. University and higher education teachers 7 032. Secondary education teachers (theoretical subjects) 18 033. Primary education teachers 5 034. Secondary education teachers (aesthetical-practical subjects) 7 036. Pre-primary education teachers, recreationactivities organizers 1 039. Educational workers nec 2 041. Ministers of religion 1 049. Religious workers nec 1 054. Legal advisors (in enterprises or other organizations) 1 061. Journalists, authors 1 072. Display artists 2 076. Composers and musicians 2 079. Artistic workers nec 1 092. Archivists and museum curators HEALTH AND NURSING WORK, SOCIAL WORK 3 101. Physicians and surgeons 6 103. Registered nurses 4 105. Medical technicians 3 106. Attendants in psychiatric care 24 107. Assistant nurses and hospital aids 1 112. Occupational therapists 2 121. Dentists 1 123. Dental assistants 2 139. Pharmaceutical workers nec 2 152. Managers of social welfare institutions 10 153. Children nurses 10 154. Home helpers 3 155. Managers and assistants (for the mentally retarded) 1 159. Social workers nec 1 161. Occupatinal, safety and public health inspectors 1 192. Dietitians and nutritionists ADMINISTRATIVE, MANAGERIAL AND CLERICAL WORK 1 201. Legislators and administrators (central government) 1 211. Business administrators 2 221. Personnel officers 8 232. Financial managers, accountants 6 241. Secretaries, stenographers 6 242. Typist 41 249. Clerical and related workers nec 2 251. Systems analysts, programmers 4 252. Computer operators 2 291. Cost computing and estimating clerks 8 292. Bank tellers and finance clerks 2 293. Insurance clerks 1 294. National insurance clerks 1 295. Tourist- and travel agency clerks 3 296. Forwarders, transport planners SALES WORK 2 311. Advertising salesmen 2 321. Buyers 5 332. Salesmen (wholesale) 67 333. Shop assistants 3 339. Sales workers (goods) nec AGRICULTURAL, FORESTRY AND FISHING WORK 5 400. Working proprietors in agriculture and forestry 1 404. Forestry managers and supervisors 25 411. Agricultural workers 1 412. Livestock, dairy and poultry farm workers 5 413. Horticultural workes 14 441. Loggers 1 449. Forestry workers nec MINING, QUARRYING AND PETROLEUM EXTRACTION WORK 1 501. Miners, quarrymen 1 509. Mining and quarrying workers nec TRANSPORT AND COMMUNICATIONS WORK 2 611. Ships' deck ratings 2 640. Bus and taxi drivers 9 641. Lorry and pickup drivers 12 643. Delivery men 1 651. Air traffic controllers 3 652. Railway conductors and yardmen 5 671. Postmasters, post office clerks 5 673. Telecommunications clerks 8 681. Mail sorting clerks and postmen 9 682. Messengers 1 689. Mail distributon clerks and messengers nec PRODUCTION WORK 1 703. Weavers, knitters 1 709. Textile workers nec 1 712. Fur tailors 2 715. Patternmakers and cutters 8 716. Dressmakers and sewers 1 719. Tailoring and sewing workers nec 1 722. Shoe cutters, lasters and sewers 1 723. Leather goods makers 1 733. Rolling-mill workers 4 736. Blacksmiths, hammersmiths and forgers 1 739. Metal processing workers nec 1 745. Jewellery and precious metal workers 12 751. Toolmakers, machinetool setters and operators 9 752. Machinery fitters 12 753. Machine assemblers and engine mechanics 8 754. Sheet-metal workers 2 755. Plumbers and pipe fitters 6 756. Welders and flame cutters 5 757. Structural metal prepares and erectors 7 759. Metal machine workers and building metal workers nec 8 761. Electrical fitters and wiremen 1 763. Electrical machinery assemblers and repairmen 5 764. Tele- and electronic repairmen and fitters 2 765. Electric linemen 6 772. Wood processing workers 1 776. Cabinet makers and joiners 4 777. Woodworking machine operators 2 779. Wood workers nec 6 781. Building painters 2 782. Floor layers 1 789. Painters and floor layers nec 3 791. Bricklayers 6 793. Concrete workers 5 794. Construction carpenters 1 799. Building and construction workers nec 1 801. Type-setters 3 803. Printing pressmen 1 804. Bookbinders 1 805. Photographic laboratory workers 2 809. Printing workers nec 4 822. Bakers and pastry cooks 1 823. Chocolate and confectionary makers 2 826. Butchers and meat preparers 1 827. Dairy workers 1 829. Food processing and tobacco workers nec 1 831. Chemical process workers 1 835. Plastic products makers 2 842. Paper makers 2 851. Cast concrete product makers 4 859. Other production and related workers nec 1 861. Stationary engine and related equipment operators 2 872. Earth-moving and related machinery operators 3 873. Truck and conveyor operators 1 879. Material handling and related equipment operators nec 5 881. Packers 2 882. Store and warehouse workers 1 891. Unskilled manual workers 1 901. Firefighters 1 902. Chimney sweeps 2 903. Policemen 3 912. Cooks 10 913. Kitchen assistants, restaurants workers 7 914. Waiters 1 915. Hotel managers, hotel receptionists 1 919. Undocumented code 35 921. Housekeepers, domestic helps 1 931. Building caretakers 8 932. Cleaners 1 939. Caretakers and cleaners nec 4 941. Hairdressers, beauticians 1 942. Bath attendants 2 951. Launderers and dry-cleaners 1 961. Coaches, horse trainers 4 981. Officers 47 999. No answer
VAR 96 FIRST JOB: SEI 15A Loc 203 width 2 MD=99 Q.15a(1). First job: SEI-group <See Q.15a for complete question text> 121 11. Unskilled employees in goods production 208 12. Unskilled employees in service production 100 21. Skilled employees in goods production 30 22. Skilled employees in service production 83 33. Assistant non-manual employees, lower level 31 36. Assistant non-manual employees, higher level 93 46. Intermediate non-manual employees 30 56. Professionals and other higher non-manual employees 57. Upper-level executives 60. Self employed professionals 1 79. Self-employed without employees, entrepeneurs 5 89. Medium-scale farmers 47 99. No answer
VAR 97 FIRST JOB EMPLOYED 15C Loc 205 width 1 MD=9 Q.15c. Were you self-employed, or did you work for someone else? 11 1. Selfemployed without employees 5 2. Selfemployed with employeed 685 3. Employed 48 9. No answer
VAR 98 PRESENT OCCUPATION 16A Loc 206 width 3 MD=999 Q.16a. What is your present occupation? If you do not have a job right now please give your last occupation? Remark: This is a question with an open answer that has been coded according to the occupational classification NYK which is roughly comparable to the ISO-codings (International Standard Classification of Occupation). PROFESSIONAL, TECHNICAL AND RELATED WORK 8 001. Architects, civil engineers and civil engineering technicians 2 002. Electrical engineers and technicians 9 003. Electronics and teletechnical communications engineers and technicians 11 004. Mechanical engineers and technicians 5 005. Chemical engineers and technicians 2 006. Metallurgists, mining and petroleum engineers and technicians 7 007. Engineers and engineering technicians nec 3 008. Surveyors and cartographical engineers and technicians 5 009. Technical workers nec 1 012. Laboratory technicians and assistants (not medical lab) 1 013. Laboratory assistans (medical lab) 1 015. Meteorologits, hydrologists 2 016. Chemists, physicists, laboratory engineers 1 022. Agricultural advisors 2 030. Principals, headmasters 4 031. University and higher education teachers 7 032. Secondary education teachers (theoretical subjects) 17 033. Primary education teachers 3 034. Secondary education teachers (aesthetical-practical subjects) 2 035. Technical education teachers 9 036. Pre-primary education teachers, recreationactivitiesorganizers 1 037. Educational methods advisors 4 039. Educational workers nec 3 041. Ministers of religion 1 049. Religious workers nec 1 053. Other jursits (private practice) 7 061. Journalists, authors 1 071. Sculptors, painters and commercial artists 1 074. Photographers 3 076. Composers and musicians 1 077. Producers, directors, stage managers (film, theatre) 2 079. Artistic workers nec HEALTH AND NURSING WORK, SOCIAL WORK 4 101. Physicians and surgeons 7 103. Registered nurses 2 104. Midwives 4 105. Medical technicians 3 106. Attendants in psychiatric care 27 107. Assistant nurses and hospital aids 2 109. Health and nursing workers nec 1 112. Occupational therapists 3 121. Dentists 1 123. Dental assistants 1 131. Pharmacists 4 139. Pharmaceutical workers nec 3 151. Social and social welfare workers 2 152. Managers of social welfare instutions 18 153. Childrens nurses 17 154. Home helpers 1 155. Managers and assistans (fore the mentally retarded) 1 159. Social workers nec 2 162. Safety engineers, ergonomists 1 169. Environment and health protection workers nec 1 191. Psychologists ADMINISTRATIVE, MANAGERIAL AND CLERICAL WORK 3 201. Legislators and administrators (central government) 2 202. Legislators and administrators (county council administration) 3 203. Legislators and administrators (local government) 15 211. Business administrators 1 212. Organisation administrators 1 219. Business administrative workers nec 4 221. Personnel officers 3 222. Employment exchange officials 4 231. Auditors 9 232. Financial managers, accountants 7 241. Secretaries, stenographers 1 242. Typists 19 249. Clerical and related workers nec 4 251. Systems analysts, programmers 1 252. Computer operators 1 261. Economists 3 291. Cost computing and estimating clerks 5 292. Bank tellers and finance clerks 5 293. Insurance clerks 4 294. National insurance clerks 2 295. Tourist- and travel agency clerks 1 296. Forwarders, transport planners 3 297. Property managers 4 299. Administrative, managerial and clerical workers nec SALES WORK 5 311. Advertising salesmen 2 312. Real estate and securities brokers 1 313. Business services salesmen 2 321. Buyers 7 331. Working proprietors, wholesale and retail trade 14 332. Salesmen (wholesale) 30 333. Shop assistants 1 339. Sales workers nec AGRICULTURAL, FORESTRY AND FISHING WORK 19 400. Working proprietors in agriculture and forestry 2 404. Forestry managers and supervisors 3 411. Agricultural workers 1 412. Livestock, dairy and poultry farm workers 1 413. Horticultural workers 1 414. Fur-bearing animal farm workers and reindeer herdsmen 2 441. Loggers TRANSPORT AND COMMUNICATIONS WORK 1 611. Ships' deck ratings 1 621. Aircraft pilots, navigators and flight engineers 2 631. Railway engine drivers 9 640. Bus and taxi drivers 18 641. Lorry and pickup drivers 1 642. Tram and underground drivers 2 652. Railway conductors and yardmen 1 664. Road transport supervisors 1 669. Transport supervisors nec 5 671. Postmasters, post office clerks 1 673. Telecommunications clerks 3 674. Telephone operators 7 681. Mail sorting clerks and postmen 4 682. Messengers PRODUCTION WORK 3 716. Dressmakers and sewers 1 733. Rolling-mill workers 1 737. Metal casters and moulders 2 739. Metal processing workers nec 2 741. Precision-instrument makers 1 744. Dental technicians 1 749. Precision-tool manufacturing workers nec 7 751. Toolmakers, machinetool setters and operators 8 752. Machinery fitters 11 753. Machine assemblers and engine mechanics 4 754. Sheet-metal workers 1 755. Plumbers and pipe fitters 3 756. Welders and flame cutters 5 759. Metal machine workers and building metal workers nec 4 761. Electrical fitters and wiremen 1 763. Electrical machinery assemblers and repairmen 6 764. Tele- and electronic repairmen and fitters 2 765. Electric linemen 2 772. Wood processing workers 1 777. Woodworking machine operators 6 781. Building painters 3 782. Floor layers 3 783. Painters (others than building) 3 791. Bricklayers 9 793. Concrete workers 7 794. Construction carpenters 1 796. Glaziers 1 799. Building and construction workers nec 2 801. Type-setters 1 802. Printing and photo engravers 1 803. Printing pressmen 1 805. Photographic laboratory workers 1 809. Printing workers nec 1 819. Glass, pottery and tile workers nec 2 822. Bakers and pastry cooks 4 826. Butchers and meat preparers 3 829. Food processing and tobacco workers nec 1 831. Chemical process workers 2 835. Plastic products makers 1 841. Paper pulp preparers 2 842. Paper makers 2 843. Paper product makers 3 859. Other production and related workers nec 1 861. Stationary engine and related equipment operators 5 872. Earth-moving and related machinery operators 4 873. Truck and conveyor operators 4 881. Packers 3 882. Store and warehouse workers 1 901. Firefighters 2 902. Chimney sweeps 2 903. Policemen 1 904. Custom officials 2 911. Catering supervisors 6 912. Cooks 9 913. Kitchen assistents, restaurants workers 2 914. Waiters 5 931. Building caretakers 20 932. Cleaners 3 941. Hairdressers, beauticians 2 981. Officers 67 999. No answer
VAR 99 OCCUPATION: SEI 16A Loc 209 width 2 MD=99 Q.16a(1). Present occupation: SEI-group <See Q.16a for complete question text> 52 11. Unskilled employees in goods production 134 12. Unskilled employees in service production 80 21. Skilled employees in goods production 38 22. Skilled employees in service production 35 33. Assistant non-manual employees, lower level 66 36. Assistant non-manual employees, higher level 125 46. Intermediate non-manual employees 64 56. Professionals and other higher non-manual employees 19 57. Upper-level executives 9 60. Self employed professionals 39 79. Self-employed without employees, entrepeneurs 21 89. Medium-scale farmers 67 99. No answer
VAR 100 SELFEMPLOYED/EMPLOYD 16C Loc 211 width 1 MD=9 Q.16c. Are you self-employed, or do you work for someone else? 45 1. Selfemployed without employees 37 2. Selfemployed with employeed 566 3. Employed 101 9. No answer
VAR 101 PUBLIC-PRIVATE SECTOR 16 Loc 212 width 1 MD=9 Q.16e. Do you primarily work in the public or private sector? 308 1. Public sector 315 2. Private sector 126 9. No answer
VAR 102 STATUS: FATHER VS OWN 17 Loc 213 width 1 MD=9 Q.17. Please think of your present job, or the last one if you don't have one now. If you compare this job with the job your father had when you were 16 years old would you say that the level or status of your job is (or was) ... 64 1. Much higher than my father's 171 2. Higher than my father's 258 3. About equal 119 4. Lower than my father's 51 5. Much lower than my father's 22 8. Don't know my fathers occupation 64 9. No answer
VAR 103 EDUCATION 18 Loc 214 width 1 MD=9 Q.18. What is your highest educational qualification? 236 1. Folkskola eller grundskola (primary school) 242 2. Realskola, folkhögskola, yrkesskola eller 2-årig gymnasielinje (secondary 2-year) 108 3. Studentexamen, examen från 3-årig eller 4-årig gymnasielinje (eller studerande på 3-årig eller 4-årig gymnasielinje) (secondary 3-year) 150 4. Universiitets- eller högskolestudier (eller studerande på universitet eller högskola) (university) 13 9. No answer
VAR 104 INCOME PER MONTH 19 Loc 215 width 1 MD=9 Q.19. What is your approximate income per month before taxes? 77 1. - 5 999 SEK 94 2. 6 000 - 8 999 SEK 177 3. 9 000 - 11 999 SEK 169 4. 12 000 - 14 999 SEK 102 5. 15 000 - 17 999 SEK 23 6. 18 000 - 20 999 SEK 49 7. 21 000 SEK - 58 9. No answer
VAR 105 PARENTS NATIONALITY 20 Loc 216 width 1 MD=9 Q.20. Were both your parents Swedish citizens when you were born? 667 1. Swedish citizen 13 2. One was non-Swedish citizen 64 3. Both were non-Swedish citizens 5 9. No answer
VAR 106 POLITICAL PARTY 21 Loc 217 width 1 MD=9 Q.21. Which political party do you most agree with? 228 0. None 46 1. Centerpartiet (Centre party) 58 2. Folkpartiet liberalerna (Liberals) 32 3. Kristdemokratiska samhällspartiet (Christian democrates) 19 4. Miljöpartiet - de gröna (Ecologists) 125 5. Moderata samlingspartiet (Liberal conservatives) 151 6. Socialdemokratiska arbetarpartiet (Social democrats) 23 7. Vänsterpartiet (Socialists) 24 8. Other 43 9. No answer
VAR 107 MARITAL STATUS 22 Loc 218 width 1 MD=9 Q.22. Are you single or married/cohabiting? 206 1. Single 538 2. Married/cohabiting 5 9. No answer
VAR 108 SPOUSES OCCUPATION 23A Loc 219 width 3 MD=999 Q.23a. What is your spouses present occupation? If he/she do not have a job right now please write down the last regular job he/she has had. Remark: This is a question with an open answer that has been coded according to the occupational classification NYK which is roughly comparable to the ISO-codings (International Standard Classification of Occupations). PROFESSIONAL, TECHNICAL AND RELATED WORK 11 001. Architects, civil engineers and civil engineering technicians 4 002. Electrical engineers and technicians 3 003. Electronics and teletechnical communications engineers and technicians 5 004. Mechanical engineers and technicians 1 005. Chemical engineers and technicians 2 006. Metallurgists, mining and petroleum engineers and technicians 3 007. Engineers and engineering technicians nec 1 008. Surveyors and cartographical engineers and technicians 8 009. Technical workers nec 1 012. Laboratory technicians and assistants (not medical lab) 2 013. Laboratory assistans (medical lab) 3 016. Chemists, physicists, laboratory engineers 1 021. Biologists 1 022. Agricultural advisors 1 030. Principals, headmasters 3 031. University and higher education teachers 2 032. Secondary education teachers (theoretical subjects) 14 033. Primary education teachers 2 034. Secondary education teachers (aesthetical-practical subjects) 2 035. Technical education teachers 5 036. Pre-primary education teachers, recreationactivities organizers 2 039. Educational workers nec 2 049. Religious workers nec 3 061. Journalists, authors 1 063. Programme editors (radio, TV) 1 071. Sculptors, painters and commercial artists 1 073. Designers 1 074. Photographers 1 076. Composers and musicians 1 077. Producers, directors, stage managers (film, theatre) 1 079. Artistic workers nec 1 091. Librarians HEALTH AND NURSING WORK, SOCIAL WORK 3 101. Physicians and surgeons 1 102. Nursing administrators 11 103. Registered nurses 2 104. Midwives 1 105. Medical technicians 3 106. Attendants in psychiatric care 13 107. Assistant nurses and hospital aids 1 109. Health and nursing workers nec 4 111. Physiotherapists 2 112. Occupational therapists 1 121. Dentists 3 123. Dental assistants 1 131. Pharmacists 1 139. Pharmaceutical workers nec 5 151. Social and social welfare workers 4 152. Managers of social welfare instutions 13 153. Childrens nurses 11 154. Home helpers 1 155. Managers and assistans (fore the mentally retarded) 1 162. Safety engineers, ergonomists 1 192. Dietitians and nutrionists 1 199. Health, nursing and social workers nec ADMINISTRATIVE, MANAGERIAL AND CLERICAL WORK 1 201. Legislators and administrators (central government) 2 203. Legislators and administrators (local government) 9 211. Business administrators 3 212. Organisation administrators 3 221. Personnel officers 3 222. Employment exchange officials 1 229. Personnel workers nec 2 231. Auditors 8 232. Financial managers, accountants 3 239. Accounting workers nec 8 241. Secretaries, stenographers 2 242. Typists 24 249. Clerical and related workers nec 3 251. Systems analysts, programmers 1 259. Computer processing workers (ADP) nec 3 261. Economists 1 291. Cost computing and estimating clerks 2 292. Bank tellers and finance clerks 1 293. Insurance clerks 1 295. Tourist- and travel agency clerks 1 296. Forwarders, transport planners 6 297. Property managers 1 299. Administrative, managerial and clerical workers nec SALES WORK 1 311. Advertising salesmen 2 312. Real estate and securities brokers 1 319. Sales workers (business services and assets) nec 3 321. Buyers 10 331. Working proprietors, wholesale and retail trade 6 332. Salesmen (wholesale) 26 333. Shop assistants 1 339. Sales workers nec AGRICULTURAL, FORESTRY AND FISHING WORK 16 400. Working proprietors in agriculture and forestry 1 401. Horticultural farmers 1 411. Agricultural workers 1 412. Undocumented code 2 413. Horticultural workers 3 441. Loggers 1 462. MINING, QUARRYING AND PETROLEUM EXTRACTION WORK 1 501. Miners, quarrymen 1 509. Mining and quarrying workers nec 1 631. Railway engine drivers 6 640. Bus and taxi drivers 13 641. Lorry and pickup drivers 1 643. Delivery men 1 649. Motor vehicle drivers and delivery workers nec 2 652. Railway conductors and yardmen 1 669. Transport supervisors nec 2 671. Postmasters, post office clerks 1 674. Telephone operators 5 681. Mail sorting clerks and postmen 2 682. Messengers PRODUCTION WORK 1 711. Tailors 1 716. Dressmakers and sewers 1 737. Metal casters and moulders 2 739. Metal processing workers nec 2 741. Precision-instrument makers 5 751. Toolmakers, machinetool setters and operators 5 752. Machinery fitters 4 753. Machine assemblers and engine mechanics 2 754. Sheet-metal workers 3 755. Plumbers and pipe fitters 3 756. Welders and flame cutters 2 759. Metal machine workers and building metal workers nec 2 761. Electrical fitters and wiremen 4 764. Tele- and electronic repairmen and fitters 2 765. Electric linemen 2 772. Wood processing workers 3 777. Woodworking machine operators 3 781. Building painters 2 783. Painters (others than building) 1 791. Bricklayers 4 793. Concrete workers 7 794. Construction carpenters 2 803. Printing pressmen 2 809. Printing workers nec 1 822. Bakers and pastry cooks 1 826. Butchers and meat preparers 1 835. Plastic products makers 1 839. Chemical processing workers nec 1 842. Paper makers 1 851. Cast concrete product makers 1 854. Stone cutters and carvers 3 859. Other production and related workers nec 2 861. Stationary engine and related equipment operators 1 872. Earth-moving and related machinery operators 1 873. Truck and conveyor operators 1 881. Packers 2 882. Store and warehouse workers 3 901. Firefighters 4 903. Policemen 1 909. Civilian protective service workers nec 2 911. Catering supervisors 3 912. Cooks 11 913. Kitchen assistents, restaurants workers 5 914. Waiters 2 931. Building caretakers 13 932. Cleaners 3 941. Hairdressers, beauticians 1 951. Launderers and dry-cleaners 3 990. Workers reporting occupations unidentifiable or inadequately described 241 999. No answer
VAR 109 SPOUSE: SEI 23A Loc 222 width 2 MD=99 Q.23a(1). Spouse: SEI-group <See Q.23a for complete question text> 30 11. Unskilled employees in goods production 101 12. Unskilled employees in service production 57 21. Skilled employees in goods production 23 22. Skilled employees in service production 34 33. Assistant non-manual employees, lower level 49 36. Assistant non-manual employees, higher level 105 46. Intermediate non-manual employees 39 56. Professionals and other higher non-manual employees 18 57. Upper-level executives 6 60. Self employed professionals 30 79. Self-employed without employees, entrepeneurs 16 89. Medium-scale farmers 241 99. No answer
VAR 110 SPOUSE EMPLOYED 23C Loc 224 width 1 MD=9 Q.23c. Are your spouse self-employed, or does he/she work for someone else? 34 1. Selfemployed without employees 27 2. Selfemployed with employeed 423 3. Employed 265 9. No answer
VAR 111 SPOUSE: MONTH INCOME 24 Loc 225 width 1 MD=9 Q.24. What is your spouses approximate income per month before taxes? 43 1. - 5 999 SEK 65 2. 6 000 - 8 999 SEK 129 3. 9 000 - 11 999 SEK 122 4. 12 000 - 14 999 SEK 57 5. 15 000 - 17 999 SEK 24 6. 18 000 - 20 999 SEK 34 7. 21 000 SEK - 275 9. No answer
VAR 112 ANSWER Loc 226 width 1 Answer Kod: 1 2 4 Frek: 641 107 1
VAR 113 INFL Loc 227 width 2 Infl Kod: 10 11 15 64 Frek: 429 107 212 1
VAR 114 V96 Loc 229 width 2 MD=10 V96 Kod: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 10 Frek: 131 80 83 105 57 6 30 16 241